Windows Patch Day – Bring on the BSOD!

Windows XP users are not very happy campers this week. Microsoft is busy investigating a multitude of reports that claim MS10-015, which was rolled out on Tuesday, is causing XP installations to blue-screen. Microsoft has acknowledged that this particular patch appears to be at fault, but are still unwilling to state that the issues are related solely to that. Instead, they are looking in to the situation further, trying to determine if this could possibly be the result of interoperability issues with another component, or even third-party software.

Sadly, there doesn’t seem to be a quick fix to this problem. The only option given thus far is to arm yourself with your XP installation CD, and dive into your Recovery Console. Once there, you will need to execute a series of commands to put things right.

If you own a computer that has an OEM copy of Windows, you likely don’t have an XP cd. If not – you’re basically out of luck at this point. Well, you could always create a boot disk. That option requires you to use a floppy drive… something many of us no longer even have!

Many Microsoft naysayers are loudly proclaiming that this is the company’s way of trying to force people to upgrade to Windows 7. While that is an option to solve the problem, I feel that the claim itself is hogwash. Sales of Windows 7 is quite high. The company has been up-front with us for a long time regarding support for Windows XP. I honestly cannot believe they would stoop that low. People who are spreading junk like this make me want to tear my hair out.

I DO agree that problems like this are ludicrous, and should not be happening. If the issue is this widespread, it should have been found out during testing, far prior to being released. In that respect, I feel that the folks in Redmond have failed miserably.

  • Paul

    While I too do not agree with the conspiracy theory, I do think that MS no longer worries about breaking systems they no longer support or will stop supporting in the near future. I have seen this over the years with versions of MS Access (or Office, as a whole). Our company continued to use Access 2003 to develop in because they (and their clients) didn't like the newer Office interface. It seemed that after every 10 or 20 updates, some strange new quirk would show up in our client's software. MS's answer: get upgraded to 2007!

  • Paul

    While I too do not agree with the conspiracy theory, I do think that MS no longer worries about breaking systems they no longer support or will stop supporting in the near future. I have seen this over the years with versions of MS Access (or Office, as a whole). Our company continued to use Access 2003 to develop in because they (and their clients) didn't like the newer Office interface. It seemed that after every 10 or 20 updates, some strange new quirk would show up in our client's software. MS's answer: get upgraded to 2007!

  • So, should we turn off automatic updates? I'm on a netbook (no floppy or CD) and travelling and can't afford to lose my system!

  • So, should we turn off automatic updates? I'm on a netbook (no floppy or CD) and travelling and can't afford to lose my system!

  • Crowbar6761

    When Microsoft updates break your computer, Microsoft offers tech support for free.se

  • Crowbar6761

    When Microsoft updates break your computer, Microsoft offers tech support for free.se

  • Ron Kinner

    Semantec claims the problem is with infected systems:

    http://www.symantec.com/connect/blogs/tidserv-and-ms10-015

  • Ron Kinner

    Semantec claims the problem is with infected systems:

    http://www.symantec.com/connect/blogs/tidserv-and-ms10-015

  • Ironic that many people are jumping to the conclusion that Windows Update is responsible, and recommending that auto-updates be disabled. When in fact, an updated computer may have avoided the problem.

    It's become quite clear that the people negatively impacted by this patch were infected with malware. Specifically, a rootkit called TDSS. The update didn't break anything. The system was infected before the update took place, and that caused the machine not to be able to boot.

    The TDSS rootkit is tricky to remove, and if not done correctly can also cause a system to be unbootable. Thankfully, Kaspersky has developed a simple tool for it's removal, TDSSKiller.

  • Ironic that many people are jumping to the conclusion that Windows Update is responsible, and recommending that auto-updates be disabled. When in fact, an updated computer may have avoided the problem.

    It's become quite clear that the people negatively impacted by this patch were infected with malware. Specifically, a rootkit called TDSS. The update didn't break anything. The system was infected before the update took place, and that caused the machine not to be able to boot.

    The TDSS rootkit is tricky to remove, and if not done correctly can also cause a system to be unbootable. Thankfully, Kaspersky has developed a simple tool for it's removal, TDSSKiller.

  • SurlyRider

    Microsoft is offering a Fix it to use instead of the KB977165 patch, found here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/979682

    Microsoft Fix it 50364.
    http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9708887

  • SurlyRider

    Microsoft is offering a Fix it to use instead of the KB977165 patch, found here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/979682

    Microsoft Fix it 50364.
    http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=9708887

  • SpaceInvader75

    Microsoft may not stoop that low, but they have done some questionable things, in my opinion. I still remember being angry that Halo 2 was only released for Vista. Can anyone give me a valid reason for this other than an attempt to get more customers to buy Vista?

  • SpaceInvader75

    Microsoft may not stoop that low, but they have done some questionable things, in my opinion. I still remember being angry that Halo 2 was only released for Vista. Can anyone give me a valid reason for this other than an attempt to get more customers to buy Vista?

  • ThaMadGreek

    LOL it is so funny that someone tries to cover it with a malware issue. But I guess that is what you get for running an exploitable operating system. I tried to go back to MS when Vista came out thinking I need to get on board again just to be insulted that I was just another paying beta tester for the MS org. Why pay for something that is not complete?

  • ThaMadGreek

    LOL it is so funny that someone tries to cover it with a malware issue. But I guess that is what you get for running an exploitable operating system. I tried to go back to MS when Vista came out thinking I need to get on board again just to be insulted that I was just another paying beta tester for the MS org. Why pay for something that is not complete?

  • moonvisage

    I have had consistent problem with windows xp restarting on my sony vaio laptop.It stalls as windows is loading.It only seems to happen,after i have received the very latest windows xp updates.The problem does not occur with my sony vaio PC,only with my Sony Vaio K series laptop.

  • moonvisage

    I have had consistent problem with windows xp restarting on my sony vaio laptop.It stalls as windows is loading.It only seems to happen,after i have received the very latest windows xp updates.The problem does not occur with my sony vaio PC,only with my Sony Vaio K series laptop.

  • Shadow

    On the last couple of, rather large, patch Tuesdays, my ATI Omega Drivers were uninstalled with the patch. I had to reinstall them after the patches, which shouldn't happen. Not sure how Catalyst drivers fared, but wow :/

  • Shadow

    On the last couple of, rather large, patch Tuesdays, my ATI Omega Drivers were uninstalled with the patch. I had to reinstall them after the patches, which shouldn't happen. Not sure how Catalyst drivers fared, but wow :/