What are the relevant IT certifications in 2010?

image What certifications should I get? We often get this question in our forums. While certifications seems to have become less important related to job experience, in this tight job market the opposite seems true. Courtesy of networkworld.com, here are the top 5 certifications for 2010. Please follow the source link for all the gritty details:

  1. VMware Certified Professional
  2. Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist
  3. Cisco Certified Architect
  4. CompTIA Strata Green IT
  5. Building on the basics, CompTIA just announced a new training track, green IT. CompTIA’s Strata Green IT certificate is recommended for IT professionals with 18 months of technical experience and IT credentials such as CompTIA A+ or Server+, and the program is designed to show that a candidate is schooled in power management as well as virtualization techniques. The certification also includes training on developing and calculating ROI for green IT initiatives and knowledge of environmentally sound waste disposal techniques.

  6. ITIL v3 Foundations

Source: networkworld.com

  • Dino

    Please note that pursuing certification just to complete them is not the appropriate way to get started in this industry. You must have a true purpose in mind to acheive a certification and a plan to recoup the time and money invested in the certification.

    I would recommend purchasing a membership in ACM (http://www.acm.org) and IEEE Computer Society (http://www.computer.org). Both offer Element K courses in various technical, personal, and management subjects. There are Microsoft Official Curriculum courses on the majority of Microsoft technologies. These are the same courses offered at official training sites in an e-learning format. You can look at http://www.microsoft.com/learning, find the certification you want, and check the Preparation Materials section to see if there is an E-learning course.

    In addition to courses, both offer Safari books online with 600 books available from each. ACM offers Books 24/7 as well. All of this for $99/year per association! Safari books alone is around $600 plus.

    If you are enrolled in Geeks to Go University, I would recommend the MCITP Consumer Support Tech certification as a follow up. From there I would tackle the CompTia A+, Network+, and Security+. In between, you might want to look at TCP/IP courses and/or books.

    Find a local computer shop in your area and offer your services there. You might have to volunteer a few hours due to the economy (Blair, do you have any salary info for computer techs). No matter what you decide to do, always be useful and be truthful. Never volunteer or offer services for something you know nothing about.

    Good luck in your career!

    Dino

  • Dino

    Please note that pursuing certification just to complete them is not the appropriate way to get started in this industry. You must have a true purpose in mind to acheive a certification and a plan to recoup the time and money invested in the certification.

    I would recommend purchasing a membership in ACM (http://www.acm.org) and IEEE Computer Society (http://www.computer.org). Both offer Element K courses in various technical, personal, and management subjects. There are Microsoft Official Curriculum courses on the majority of Microsoft technologies. These are the same courses offered at official training sites in an e-learning format. You can look at http://www.microsoft.com/learning, find the certification you want, and check the Preparation Materials section to see if there is an E-learning course.

    In addition to courses, both offer Safari books online with 600 books available from each. ACM offers Books 24/7 as well. All of this for $99/year per association! Safari books alone is around $600 plus.

    If you are enrolled in Geeks to Go University, I would recommend the MCITP Consumer Support Tech certification as a follow up. From there I would tackle the CompTia A+, Network+, and Security+. In between, you might want to look at TCP/IP courses and/or books.

    Find a local computer shop in your area and offer your services there. You might have to volunteer a few hours due to the economy (Blair, do you have any salary info for computer techs). No matter what you decide to do, always be useful and be truthful. Never volunteer or offer services for something you know nothing about.

    Good luck in your career!

    Dino

  • Aramis

    I wanted to know what the best way to prepare for the A + bridge exam. My certification is expired and I'd like to upgrade it. Is this the appropriate section to ask this question?

  • Aramis

    I wanted to know what the best way to prepare for the A + bridge exam. My certification is expired and I'd like to upgrade it. Is this the appropriate section to ask this question?

  • Dino

    I would recommend signing up at the Geeks to Go Forum. From there you can post your question in the appropriate sub forum.

    As for preparing for any exam - bridged or otherwise - the best way is to get a book from an author or publisher you enjoy using and start using the exercises in the book to prepare you for the certification.

    I find that reading the book from cover to cover isn't the best method to approach preparing for a cert. You want to work in a scenario mode so that you can "see" what it is they are talking about.

    If you have been working in the technician field for the last 10 years, you can go to Boson and get their A+ test bank and start answering questions, noting the ones that you missed and concentrating on that.

    Also remember to get a voucher for the test - never pay full price for a CompTIA test - there are no second chances, and you shouldn't pay more than $150 for it. It might be more now because of the economy. Get Certified for Less and Go Certify are two companies that offer vouchers. Do a Google search on A+ certificaton vouchers for more.

    Dino

  • Dino

    I would recommend signing up at the Geeks to Go Forum. From there you can post your question in the appropriate sub forum.

    As for preparing for any exam - bridged or otherwise - the best way is to get a book from an author or publisher you enjoy using and start using the exercises in the book to prepare you for the certification.

    I find that reading the book from cover to cover isn't the best method to approach preparing for a cert. You want to work in a scenario mode so that you can "see" what it is they are talking about.

    If you have been working in the technician field for the last 10 years, you can go to Boson and get their A+ test bank and start answering questions, noting the ones that you missed and concentrating on that.

    Also remember to get a voucher for the test - never pay full price for a CompTIA test - there are no second chances, and you shouldn't pay more than $150 for it. It might be more now because of the economy. Get Certified for Less and Go Certify are two companies that offer vouchers. Do a Google search on A+ certificaton vouchers for more.

    Dino

  • JOI

    I have the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist cert 🙂
    It proves that you are knowledgeable and seperates you from amateurs who think they know stuff about a particular Microsoft technology.

  • JOI

    I have the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist cert 🙂
    It proves that you are knowledgeable and seperates you from amateurs who think they know stuff about a particular Microsoft technology.

  • Ronin Vladiamhe

    Thanks for the cert info. It will really come in handy as I seek to further involve myself in the IT community.