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Hard drive dilemma


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#1
Boyo

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Hi. I am building my first rig, and I am having trouble deciding which is the best set up. I have read a lot of articles about using RAID. Some, like AnandTech advise not using RAID, while others, Overclockers.com, say it is the way to go. Here are the 2 different configurations I am considering. Since this is my first rig, I could really use some advice. Thanks

2x WD 7200.9 8MB Cache 200GB RAID 0
or
1 WD 10,000 8MB Cache 74GB
1 WD 7200.9 16MB Cache 250GB
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#2
SRX660

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In a raid setup with only 2 drives you can only do a raid0 or a raid1.

Heres raid0.


Characteristics & Advantages
RAID 0 implements a striped disk array, the data is broken down into blocks and each block is written to a separate disk drive. I/O performance is greatly improved by spreading the I/O load across many channels and drives.

Disadvantages
Not a "True" RAID because it is NOT fault-tolerant.
The failure of just one drive will result in all data in an array being lost.

And raid1.


Characteristics & Advantages
100% redundancy of data means no rebuild is necessary in case of a disk failure, just a copy to the replacement disk.

Disadvantages
Highest disk overhead of all RAID types (100%) - inefficient.

For a home computer system raid is not needed. There is not enough of a speed up factor for normal use. It would be far better to use a second hard drive to store all data and downloaded programs on. This way if you ever have to reformat and reinstall windows you lose none of the data. If the second drive ever fails you can lose all your data. For that reason i also do a backup of data and programs to CD's or DVD's on a regular basis. RAID is really more for servers that use a lot of bandwidth delivering data to a network or the internet.

SRX660
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#3
Kemasa

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In general, RAID0 (AID actually), is not worth it unless you have a need for a large data space and can't spread the data over multiple disks manually. You need to realize that a failure on one disk means you lose all the data.

RAID1 is good if you need to protect your data. On a PC it will not generally help with performance and in fact it could be worse since all the data has to be written to both disks. It basically is an automatic backup and is useful if you have critical data on your machine.

So, it depends on what you are going to be doing and how critical the data is. Backing up your data may be enough so that you don't need the data protection of RAID1, but remember just because you have a RAID setup does not mean that you don't need to do backups since there are things that can happen which will cause you to lose all your data.
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#4
mcpscomp

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Just add in.
Most of motherboard on maket are made not for RAID. some of them have the option to support but the driver for that option are mostly sloppy. for home use it is not worth it. Bad choice.
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#5
Boyo

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Thank you for breaking it down guys.....I will be staying away from RAID. I have an external HD that I use to back up all my data so even RAID1 is pointless......I just wasn't sure if RAID0 really offered the increase in speed. Guess Not.
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#6
jrm20

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Dont use raid its not so great that its hyped up to be.

You just dont need it, trust me. If you are affraid of losing data on one harddrive, just copy and paste the folder/file to the other harddrive.

You can always make another copy of the Program or Movie for example on the other harddrive just copy and paste and tada your done..
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#7
Kemasa

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Dont use raid its not so great that its hyped up to be.

You just dont need it, trust me. If you are affraid of losing data on one harddrive, just copy and paste the folder/file to the other harddrive.

You can always make another copy of the Program or Movie for example on the other harddrive just copy and paste and tada your done..


Sigh ... I think that instead of telling people what they should do, you should list the positves and negatives for each suggestion, especially when you don't know what the person is going to be doing with it, at home or not. If the person is dealing with critical data, which often the person does not say what they are doing exactly. For example, if a person was using the computer to record an interview (some people do work at home and often people don't say where the computer is) and it would be impossible to redo the interview, then having good data protection is critical.

RAID is a very good thing, if you need it, and nothing else will replace it. The thing is that many people don't really need it so that it is best to not bother with it, but some people should use it and don't. Many people don't back up their data either and some of the data is important. While it is true that some people hype RAID, the simple fact is that many people use and have protected their data against disk failures and downtime.

Manually copying files is fine as long as the data does not change all that often and you can afford to lose the data between copies. Also, if you copy the data to one location, it is possible that a failure could occur at that point in time, causing a loss of data. It is best to have multiple locations to copy the data to.
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#8
jrm20

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Sigh ... I think that instead of telling people what they should do, you should list the positves and negatives for each suggestion, especially when you don't know what the person is going to be doing with it, at home or not. If the person is dealing with critical data, which often the person does not say what they are doing exactly. For example, if a person was using the computer to record an interview (some people do work at home and often people don't say where the computer is) and it would be impossible to redo the interview, then having good data protection is critical.

RAID is a very good thing, if you need it, and nothing else will replace it. The thing is that many people don't really need it so that it is best to not bother with it, but some people should use it and don't. Many people don't back up their data either and some of the data is important. While it is true that some people hype RAID, the simple fact is that many people use and have protected their data against disk failures and downtime.

Manually copying files is fine as long as the data does not change all that often and you can afford to lose the data between copies. Also, if you copy the data to one location, it is possible that a failure could occur at that point in time, causing a loss of data. It is best to have multiple locations to copy the data to.



Sounds like your just looking for an argument. You went to saying raid wasnt worth it now your sounding as if you like raid now.

I read what all he typed and from the sound of it he doesnt need raid at all. If it was important he would of told us straight forward it was for business then it would be totally different..


Boyo do you use the pc just for gaming if so you dont need raid. If you do high class business then yes it would be a positive idea to use it.

You could of just explained it like you did to me Kemasa but, without the sigh. You know that we are both trusted techs dont start to become a smart butt okay. LOL.
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