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How to DELETE

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#1
Johanna

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I did not write this, a friend did, and I just ressurected it from my archives. Using this checklist, I've not met anything I couldn't get rid of, one way or another.

One rainy day in the dark past, I compiled a list of things that may help in the process of deleting "stubborn" files and folders. I'll post it for now in case it may help:

1.) Try it in Safe Mode first.

2.) Next, see if you can rename the file so that you change the extension to something that will release it from whatever has it locked; use .txt for example. Then try manipulating it afterward. If it works, then you can change the name back if you just wanted it moved.

3.) If no joy, get MoveOnBoot . Install it. It's a small freeware program that has the power to Delete, Copy, or Rename a file or group of files when you reboot and it's inactive. There are several ways to use it, here are some examples:
Run it to do the copy first to the folder of your choice and then run it again to do a delete if you wish. OR run it and rename the file and you may be able to manipulate it as you please with drag/drop etc. Then you can rename it with the right click and you'll be set. Try different methods as you prefer depending on your goal. It works on Folders as well as files but only by using the drag/drop into the main program screen.

4.) If still no joy, try taking ownership of the file. To do that follow the instructions given here:
http://support.micro...p;Product=winxp

5.) If still no joy, create a new administrator account and log off your present account and log into it. Then try moving the file onto the desktop of this new account. Then log off and go back to your original account. That may get the file to an inactive state so you can manipulate it from the new location while logged to the old identity. If you just want to delete it, then delete the old account and all files that it contains.

6.) If still no joy, run Task Manager and do an "End Process" on explorer.exe. The Desktop shell will disappear. This usually releases most problem files from whatever has a grasp on them. You'll have to use the toolbar menu of Task Manager to do your work and when you're finished, you can use the File > New Task(run) to start explorer.exe back up again and get the Desktop shell running again. If you run into difficulty getting explorer.exe back up, just click Shutdown > Restart and you'll get it all back.

Note:On Windows NT/2000/XP:
Open Windows Task Manager. Press CTRL+SHIFT+ESC and click the Processes tab.
In the list of running programs, select EXPLORER.EXE.
Right-click EXPLORER.EXE and click End Process Tree.

On Windows 9x/ME:
Download and install a third-party process viewer like Process Explorer.
Run process viewer,
In the list of running programs, select and terminate the process EXPLORER.EXE.
Close the process viewer.

7.) Run a "Process Detector" software that will give some information on what program has the data that you need to manipulate locked and disable it.

8.) If you have a FAT32 file storage system, boot to a dos boot disk and you can use ordinary dos commands to manipulate the files or folders.

9.) If you have a NTFS file storage system, boot to the install CD and invoke the Recovery Console. Use the command line mode provided to delete the file.

10.) Go to the command prompt in the start menu and type CHKDSK /F.
The system will usually tell you that the action will take place on reboot.
Once the chkdsk is run, the file ACL (access control list) is reset and you should be able to change file / folder properties or delete the file / folder.
NOTE: Some viruses, and programs will relock the files by setting garbage in the ACL soon after booting, so be quick.

11.) Try using WhoLockMe (freeware) to determine what has the files or folder locked.

Note. I'll stop short of recommending that you use a 3rd party tool to convert your system from NTFS to FAT32 in order to be able to manipulate files from a dos prompt but it IS worth mentioning in passing for EXTREME cases.

If none of those methods work, you may need to get a bigger hammer.

Johanna (TY SD2!)
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#2
fleamailman

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The moveonboot link mentioned above:

http://www.snapfiles...moveonboot.html

Thanks, I needed this.
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#3
RichP

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I'd just like to add Unlocker to this.

I've seen people try all of the above, and Unlocker works every time.
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#4
Elite[sS]

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Yah, unlocker is truly powerful, and works everytime for me! I havent had any problems with it at all.
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#5
Rekzai

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unlocker didnt work for me & #4 has a link that wasnt pasted properly
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#6
JaMeZ_19921

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I was wondering if any of these solutions will work for me because ive tried deleting a pop up many times in the proccesses in task manager and wiped it but i think every time i logon to my computer i think its being downloaded again. Is there anything that can help???
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#7
Johanna

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JaMeZ- Usually stubborn pop ups are the result of malware that knows to recreate itself, either on reboot, or as soon as the process is terminated. I suggest you visit the experts on the malware forum and describe the pop up, and what you've done to get rid of it. They will be able to kill it from the root, not just the symptom.
http://www.geekstogo..._Log-t2852.html
Johanna
PS fixed link in #4 of my original list- sorry- don't know how it got broken, but glad someone noticed and brought it to my attention. TY
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#8
Karen50

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I will try this out
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#9
Ryan_88

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i've use the program "killbox" many a time and i love it, it also kills all processes attached to the file you are trying to delete (which could be the issue you have of it installing itself all the time!)

just google it (it is freeware)

its very selfexplanitory, if not try it in safe mode!

have fun

ry
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#10
I.D.S. Administrator

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I did not write this, a friend did, and I just ressurected it from my archives. Using this checklist, I've not met anything I couldn't get rid of, one way or another.

One rainy day in the dark past, I compiled a list of things that may help in the process of deleting "stubborn" files and folders. I'll post it for now in case it may help:

1.) Try it in Safe Mode first.

2.) Next, see if you can rename the file so that you change the extension to something that will release it from whatever has it locked; use .txt for example. Then try manipulating it afterward. If it works, then you can change the name back if you just wanted it moved.

3.) If no joy, get MoveOnBoot . Install it. It's a small freeware program that has the power to Delete, Copy, or Rename a file or group of files when you reboot and it's inactive. There are several ways to use it, here are some examples:
Run it to do the copy first to the folder of your choice and then run it again to do a delete if you wish. OR run it and rename the file and you may be able to manipulate it as you please with drag/drop etc. Then you can rename it with the right click and you'll be set. Try different methods as you prefer depending on your goal. It works on Folders as well as files but only by using the drag/drop into the main program screen.

4.) If still no joy, try taking ownership of the file. To do that follow the instructions given here:
http://support.micro...p;Product=winxp

5.) If still no joy, create a new administrator account and log off your present account and log into it. Then try moving the file onto the desktop of this new account. Then log off and go back to your original account. That may get the file to an inactive state so you can manipulate it from the new location while logged to the old identity. If you just want to delete it, then delete the old account and all files that it contains.

6.) If still no joy, run Task Manager and do an "End Process" on explorer.exe. The Desktop shell will disappear. This usually releases most problem files from whatever has a grasp on them. You'll have to use the toolbar menu of Task Manager to do your work and when you're finished, you can use the File > New Task(run) to start explorer.exe back up again and get the Desktop shell running again. If you run into difficulty getting explorer.exe back up, just click Shutdown > Restart and you'll get it all back.

Note:On Windows NT/2000/XP:
Open Windows Task Manager. Press CTRL+SHIFT+ESC and click the Processes tab.
In the list of running programs, select EXPLORER.EXE.
Right-click EXPLORER.EXE and click End Process Tree.

On Windows 9x/ME:
Download and install a third-party process viewer like Process Explorer.
Run process viewer,
In the list of running programs, select and terminate the process EXPLORER.EXE.
Close the process viewer.

7.) Run a "Process Detector" software that will give some information on what program has the data that you need to manipulate locked and disable it.

8.) If you have a FAT32 file storage system, boot to a dos boot disk and you can use ordinary dos commands to manipulate the files or folders.

9.) If you have a NTFS file storage system, boot to the install CD and invoke the Recovery Console. Use the command line mode provided to delete the file.

10.) Go to the command prompt in the start menu and type CHKDSK /F.
The system will usually tell you that the action will take place on reboot.
Once the chkdsk is run, the file ACL (access control list) is reset and you should be able to change file / folder properties or delete the file / folder.
NOTE: Some viruses, and programs will relock the files by setting garbage in the ACL soon after booting, so be quick.

11.) Try using WhoLockMe (freeware) to determine what has the files or folder locked.

Note. I'll stop short of recommending that you use a 3rd party tool to convert your system from NTFS to FAT32 in order to be able to manipulate files from a dos prompt but it IS worth mentioning in passing for EXTREME cases.

If none of those methods work, you may need to get a bigger hammer.

Johanna (TY SD2!)


Good show.
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#11
Kat

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i've use the program "killbox" many a time and i love it, it also kills all processes attached to the file you are trying to delete (which could be the issue you have of it installing itself all the time!)

just google it (it is freeware)

its very selfexplanitory, if not try it in safe mode!

have fun

ry


Just a note of caution to be VERY careful if you use Killbox. It is a very powerful tool. It is always best to use tools like this under the guidance of someone trained to help you in our forums.
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#12
Laptop-noob

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Mcafee file shredder does the trick too.

you forgot the most important step, pressing the delete key :)
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#13
Chopin

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:) That tends to get rid of half of the files I need to delete... MoveEx does the rest :)
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#14
Highl0w

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Cyberscrub Great tool very powerfull as well. Will delete beyond DOD standards. Hello FBI can not recover!
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#15
TomWij

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This is the way I do it:

Use SysInternals Process Explorer to find out what processes have the handle open, close those (be careful) and then take ownership on the file and give yourself permissions.
When the handle is open by Explorer.exe you can close it and rename the file using File > Run > Browse in SysInternals Process Explorer.

No clue if it works for everything but it should, and ah... You need administrative rights. (Logic)

Edited by TomWij, 25 June 2008 - 05:15 PM.

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