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#1
RonStrand

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I work with Foster Kids with disabilities who have trouble seeing certain colors. The problem is easiest to notice when we open "START" on the Toolbar and then select "Help and Support". Or in Microsoft Word. click "Help" then select "Microsoft Office Word Help". The text is always blue. Because many of the seeing impaired kids I work with have to use a blue background with white text, the blue does not show up. I need to change the help test color to another color. I have tried all colors in Appearance and the Accessibility Options in the Control Panel and am at a loss. I have some great kids who are ready to give up because they cannot read what help says, and they want to show their independence. SOMEONE PLEASE HELP US.

Thanks, Ron
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#2
Hemal

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Hey Ron,
Welcome to GTG :tazz:. Im not very certain about how to fix this problem though i am asking around, if you can, go into the help and support, then look for the customize option on the left, and play around with those settings, hopefully someone will be able to come around and help you ;)
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#3
cnm

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It appears from this XP Help

MORE INFORMATION
Help Workshop version 4.03 is available for download from the Microsoft Download Center.

The following file is available for download from the Microsoft Download Center:

Hcwsetup.exe

that you'd need to do some recompiling of help.

I wonder if your best solution would be to buy one of the many books about Word? If the students' vision lets them read books.
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#4
coachwife6

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I took a master's level course on this subject awhile back. Let me look around. I know there's plenty of adaptive equipment out there for certain situations.
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#5
coachwife6

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The most common accommodation for a computer user with a visual impairment is to enlarge the display of a monitor. This accommodation is accomplished using screen enlargement software. Various screen enlargement packages offer a variety of features. The most popular features enlarge the display from 2 to 16 times the normal view and invert screen colors for those who are sensitive to the usual display of white text on a black background. Some enlargers also incorporate speech output to reduce the strain associated with reading large blocks of text. Commonly used enlargement software includes ZoomText Xtra™ (Ai Squared), Magnum™ (Artic), MAGic™ (Henter Joyce), and Lunar™ (Dolphin Access Systems). Freeware and shareware products are also available via the Screen Magnifiers homepage listed in the resources section.

Screen enlargement technology combined with a scanner can be used to magnify printed text. Once a page is scanned using a standard desktop scanner, the results are displayed in large print on the computer screen. Dedicated devices such as closed circuit TVs (CCTVs), also called video magnifiers, magnify printed materials, photographs, and other objects.

People who are blind access computer output with speech and/or Braille output systems. Speech output is the most popular form of access. A variety of products have been created for working with the Microsoft Windows™ operating system. Most people who are blind use a standard keyboard as an input device, since using a mouse pointer requires accurate eye-hand coordination. Screen reader software uses pre-defined key combinations for review and navigation of the computer screen and is usually compatible with most standard software, including word processing, web browsing and electronic mail. Examples include, but are not limited to, HAL™ and SuperNova™ (Dolphin Access Systems), JAWS™ for Windows (Freedom Scientific), Window Bridge™ (SYNTHA-VOICE), outSPOKEN™ (Alva Access Group), and Window-Eyes™ (GW Micro). People who are blind using a Macintosh are limited to outSPOKEN™.

Refreshable Braille displays are devices that echo information from the screen to a panel with Braille cells. Within the cells are pins that move up or down based on the text transmitted. Braille displays can provide very effective accommodations for users who require precise navigation and editing, such as when creating computer program code that isn't pronounced well with speech. Displays such as the BRAILLEX™ (Papenmeier) and Delphi™ (Alva Access Group) also provide navigation and orientation information to the computer user who is blind.

For novice screen reader users who need access to the World Wide Web, consider dedicated web browsing software that incorporates speech and/or large print. These browsers ease the process of navigating complicated websites, and simplifies web searching as well as reading of websites. Home Page Reader™ (IBM) and Connect Outloud™ (Freedom Scientific) are two of the many examples of this kind of software.


Might look at this site:

http://www.ldonline....st/reading.html
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