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Safety Of Online Purchasing W/Credit Card?


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#1
Davexx1

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First, I have never purchased on line and have never given out credit card number over the internet.

With all of the identity theft, hi jacked personal information, theft, credit card fraud, etc. I have always been too scared to make any on line purchases using my credit card number. I now need to order some computer memory stuff from NewEgg and they do not accept phone or written orders. I am worried about giving CC number to make the purchase.

I know all on line suppliers say their site is safe and the info is encrypted but, is it really safe to give credit card number over the internet and make purchases this way??

Thanks for any information and reassurance (if any).

Dave
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#2
Johanna

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I have ordered from NewEgg dozens of times and never had a problem. Here are some suggestions for safer online ordering:
1. Make sure you type the address of the reputable website into your browser- do not click on links from spam or other email offers.
2. Never check the box that says "remember my CC for my next purchase" or words to that effect
3. Look for the "lock" symbol on the payment page to be sure you are on a secure page.
4. Consider a debit card (works off of a checking account) and fund as needed for online orders. Even if someone gets the number, it won't do them much good if there is no money in the account, and in the US you can only be held responsible for $50 if the card is lost or stolen.
5. Never give out the number unless YOU initiated the transaction, whether by telephone or internet. That way you know you are dealing with the people you intended to do business with.

Johanna
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#3
ukbiker

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Hi There

4. Consider a debit card (works off of a checking account) and fund as needed for online orders. Even if someone gets the number, it won't do them much good if there is no money in the account, and in the US you can only be held responsible for $50 if the card is lost or stolen.


This is exactly what I do. Its simple and foolproof.

1. get your bank to open a secondary account for you, with NO overdraught facility and issue you with a debit card for that account.(Note, a Debit card, not a Credit card)

2. keep a minimum balance in the account so as to avoid bank charges ( amount needed will vary between banks, so check)

3. Transfer funds into your secondary account only when you want to buy something, then use the debit card for the online purchase.
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#4
31007

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I have been shopping online for a few years now, pretty much ever since I first got my computer & internet access. I have slowed down a lot in regards to the number of purchases I make over the past few months, but (knock on wood) the only problem i've ever had is a couple times paying for something, and it doesn't get shipped to me. I think that I've only had that happen twice to where I couldn't either get my money back, or get the item shipped. I used to spend a lot of money every month on ebay and a few other sites (buying CD's because the music I listen to is not widely available in stores in my location). I still pay every bill I have except for 1 (which I write & mail a check for) using online payment options. About a year ago, last time I deployed, I decided to give that "web bill pay" thing offered by my bank a try, and I have been lovin that ever since. It's set up to automatically pay 3 bills, and I originally intended to cancel it, and go back to manually paying each bill myself every month, but it's been ever so much more convenient letting the bank handle it.


I think (I may be wrong) that if someone gets ahold of your credit card number, the worst they can do is charge to it. Without access to the credit card companies files, that credit card number shouln't on it's own be able to lead to identity theft. From what I understand, it takes a social security number at the very least to steal an identity....
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#5
richc46

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Well, another Saturday night. You are all dressed and your significant other finish a wonderful Italian dinner at your favorite restaurant. You get the check, look it over, it looks right your add your 15% then signal the waiter that you are ready for him to pick up payment. You pay with your credit card and he disappears for 10 minutes. Plenty of time to make 3 online purchases and take down your number. Get my meaning?
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#6
lewie

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Just a few thoughts:

1. Always review your credit card bill for unauthorized charges, whether or not you use it to make online purchases or not. As Johanna noted, your liability is $50 if you timely catch the fraud.

2. Banks and online merchants have a huge stake in keeping their system secure. Your use is very cost effective to them and they want to closely guard that money-making golden goose!

3. Use only one credit card for online purchases and have a $500 or $1000 credit limit on it. This can cap your liability even if you blow the chance to stop it by finding it on your monthly statement.

Happy shopping!

Lewie
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