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#1
realistpnoy

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how do i know what mhz my ram is running right now? when i bought it it says 400mhz...where do i go in everest?

thanks
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#2
fleamailman

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Welcome Earthling, two links for you then but Everest has gone 30days trail so after that it's up to you. The other Drive isn't as good but it is stand alone which makes if very useful. links are:

Drive
http://www.alexnolan.../deviceinfo.htm

Everest
http://www.lavalys.c...lcat=PR&lang=en
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#3
realistpnoy

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its at 166mhz how do i change it to 200mhz?
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#4
Samm

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Before you start increasing the FSB of the RAM to 200MHz, may I suggest you check to make sure that its supposed to be running at 200MHz and not 166MHz. Just because the ram is capable of that speed, doesn't mean that the rest of the system will support it.

Use Everest again & look up your motherboard make & model number & your CPU specs please (model & clock speed, also FSB if it is stated). Let me know these specs & I'll tell you whether or not you can safely increase the ram speed.
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#5
realistpnoy

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--------[ EVEREST Home Edition © 2003-2005 Lavalys, Inc. ]------------------------------------------------------------

Version EVEREST v2.20.405
Homepage http://www.lavalys.com/
Report Type Quick Report
Computer
Generator
Operating System Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition 5.1.2600 (WinXP Retail)
Date 2006-04-03
Time 18:58


--------[ Motherboard ]-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Motherboard Properties:
Motherboard ID <DMI>
Motherboard Name Dell Dimension 4550

Front Side Bus Properties:
Bus Type Intel NetBurst
Bus Width 64-bit
Real Clock 133 MHz (QDR)
Effective Clock 533 MHz
Bandwidth 4266 MB/s

Memory Bus Properties:
Bus Type DDR SDRAM
Bus Width 64-bit
Real Clock 167 MHz (DDR)
Effective Clock 333 MHz
Bandwidth 2666 MB/s

Chipset Bus Properties:
Bus Type Intel Hub Interface
Bus Width 8-bit
Real Clock 67 MHz (QDR)
Effective Clock 267 MHz
Bandwidth 267 MB/s

Motherboard Manufacturer:
Company Name Dell Computer Corporation
Product Information http://www.dell.com
BIOS Download http://support.dell.com
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#6
Samm

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Ah, I see you have a Dell which means your chances of being able to alter the ram speed are extremely slim. Your memory is already running at a higher FSB than the cpu anyway (cpu is 133, ram is 166). Its very unlikely in that case that your system will support a memory speed of 200MHz. If it did, it would probably have automatically set the ram speed to this anyway.

Another thing to bear in mind is, if you have just added a DDR400 module to the existing ram module & the existing module was only DDR333, then you will won't be able to go higher than 333MHz even of the system does theoretically support it.
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#7
realistpnoy

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what is real clock and effective clock?
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#8
Samm

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The real clock is the actual frequency in MHz that a component (eg cpu) is running at. In the case of Intel P4's, they can transfer an item of data 4 times per clock cycle. This results in the effective speed - i.e. 4 x actual clock speed. So in the case of your cpu, the real clock is 133MHz. The effective clock is 133 x 4 = 533MHz.

Athlon cpu's however only transfer 2 data items per clock cycle. So an Athlon cpu that has a real clock of 166MHz (for example), has an effective clock of 333MHz.

DDR memory has an effective clock speed of double the system's FSB (real clock speed). BTW, FSB = front side bus.
So in theory, a if the cpu has a real clock of 133MHz, the DDR ram will have an effective clock of 266MHz.
However, as in your case, thats not always so. This is due to the motherboards ability to change the RAM:FSB ratio. EG when both the cpu & the ram have a real clock of 133MHz, the ratio is 1:1. By adjusting this ratio however, the real clock of the ram can be changed independently of the CPU's real clock. In your case, the RAM:FSB ratio (133:166) is 4:5
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#9
realistpnoy

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i understand the first part =) ok i got another question im planning to buy new graphics card EVGA GeForce 7800GS SC...in this site there are three types should i get the superclock one? because i heard overclocking shortens the lifespan. (whats the best for gaming?)

thanks

http://www.newegg.co...=&Go.x=0&Go.y=0
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#10
Samm

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Hi, sorry for the delay in replying.

To be honest, I am not a gamer & therefore not the best person to ask about specific video cards. You are right in thinking that overclocking can shorten the life of that component, so I guess the superclock one would be better than a slighly slower one thats overclocked to the same speed.

The only thing you may want to check though, before spending $300 on a new video card, is the max AGP rate supported by your system. The video card will only run at maximum performance if your system supports AGP 8x.

If you run Everest, it should tell you what the motherboards max supported agp rate is (This will be either 4x or 8x).
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#11
realistpnoy

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how do i know if my comp support (Core clock) 460MHz on the video card?

http://www.newegg.co...N82E16814130273

Edited by realistpnoy, 09 April 2006 - 02:09 PM.

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#12
realistpnoy

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^ bump
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#13
Samm

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All you need to worry about is whether or not your system supports 8x AGP. If it does, then it will support everything else.
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