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Socket 775 instalation


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#1
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I think I am getting my self woryed over nothing but here goes:

Tomorow I will be buying a Socket 775 Mobo and cpu, and I have read the instructions from intel as well as other sites such as hardwarezone. I have a few questions:

Some say to remove plastic cover first, before lifting load plate, while others recomend after. Does it mater.
Intell recomend removeing plastic cover on the hing side, other recomend on the sides.

Some say to gently hold the load plate before lifting the lever to prevent the lad plate from snaping back in a mouse trap style and bending pins. Anyone have experince with this socket?

They say it requires some force to secure the lever after the processor has been seated, I hope it is not alot.

hardware zone says cpu will fit snugly into socket when placed, do I put any force, or just verticle movement and release?
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#2
Seven!

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I haven't installed a socket 775 CPU before, but I imagine that it isn't much different from my socket 939. It's not a big deal, the manual will have large pictures (mine didn't have any text at all!).

The only thing you might be concerned with is application of thermal paste. If you have a thermal pad, it won't be necessary, but some Arctic Silver properly applied to the die of the heatsink is always useful =].
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#3
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Thanks, I have a tendancy to wory over things.

I guess what realy concerns me is that, as I start my computer career, I first get used to the socket 370, then I build a system for a client and see for the first time a 475, Sure Cpu install was flawless, lift lever, drop CPU, close lever. Ahh but then the freken heatsink. I clip all 4 corners, then proceed with the first lever, and i feel the thing twist, then the second lever required alot of force I stoped, and called the vendor. The tech did it for me.

So now I coose a 775 for upgradability in the future but then notice, ahh the pins, are on the board? what??

So as long as I do what I am told, dont touch pins, or pads and just handle by edges and line everything up I should be fine and in the end I get my first ever 2.8GHz computer. 1GHz was not cutting it.
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#4
troppo

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but make sure you seat the processor correctly there is a missing pin on one of the corners the manual will show you exactly how to do this buti m just reminding you so you dont bend the pins goodluck,
troppo
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#5
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Thanks all, well today is D-Day, I leave in about 1 hour. And i even dreamed of the socket all night, ive memorized all the steps.

I realize there is notches on socket for alignment and even cutouts for my fingers. So I just lower it slowly and drop into place, manual on intel site says nothing about adding pressure is this correct?
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#6
Seven!

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Well there is generally enough friction caused by the pins to require you to push slightly, but MAKE SURE THE CPU IS ON CORRECTLY, if you BEND PINS, then you're screwed.
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#7
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Just got CPU and Heatsink installed, went flawless, I think:

Is it normal for the board to have a bend? I know with skt 475 it did but also with 775?
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#8
Neil Jones

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The way that 775 processors are installed and lock into place (via the plastic pegs in corner positions around the processor ZIF socket) usually means you have to exhert some sort of pressure to get the thing to lock in. The boards are designed to flex to some degree but never to a point where it looks like breaking.
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#9
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thanks, just got it all installed and running, typeing this message on new system. All seems great, except alittle noisy, hmm. Should I install an extra case fan? Little hot in there when opened up.

Well it looks bent about as much as the socket 475

Gotta restart for now, then install asus drivers to get audiop working then find out how to check temperature.

So what is the normal heat of cpu anyway?
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#10
Seven!

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An intel? About 15million Kelvins.

No, lol, about 40c idle should be right. If you feel it's hot, (or if it IS hot, ASUS should have some temperature measuring utilities) then you can buy a new HSF and lower temps pretty nicely for <50$.
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#11
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Ok so I installed PC Probe, and have the following as I type this:

CPU Temp: 36 C
Motherboard: 39 C

Is that good?
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#12
Seven!

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That's just dandy.
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#13
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Thanks for all the help. I just enabled QFan in bios and system is much quieter now.
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