Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Scan Disk won't run


  • Please log in to reply

#16
Retired Tech

Retired Tech

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 20,563 posts
You can force ScanDisk for Windows to retest bad clusters by modifying the value for the following registry key: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Applets\Check Drive\Settings

This registry key will exist only if ScanDisk for Windows has already been run. To have ScanDisk test clusters that have been marked as bad, modify the Settings value so that the last two digits are "04." For example, if the current value for Settings is B1 03 40 00

change it to read: B1 03 40 04

http://support.micro...kb/127055/en-us

It also lists anything from malware to certain programmes installed
  • 0

Advertisements


#17
kepkorn

kepkorn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 49 posts
so i did that (changed the end to 04), and now what do i do?

Edited by kepkorn, 09 April 2006 - 03:55 PM.

  • 0

#18
Retired Tech

Retired Tech

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 20,563 posts
Try running scandisk
  • 0

#19
kepkorn

kepkorn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 49 posts
same error message
  • 0

#20
Retired Tech

Retired Tech

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 20,563 posts
Try here

http://support.micro...kb/229154/en-us

CAUSE
This problem may occur if either of the following conditions is true:• You are running Windows on a hard disk that is larger than 8 gigabytes (GB) and that has a cluster size that is smaller than 8 kilobytes (KB).

This configuration may occur if you use a third-party disk tool to create a partition on a hard disk that is larger than 8 GB and that has a cluster size that is smaller than 8 KB.

-or-

• You are running Windows on a very large hard disk that has a default Windows cluster size of 32 KB.
  • 0

#21
kepkorn

kepkorn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 49 posts
so i dont really understand, according to the microsoft website my clusters should be 16kb...how do i change this?
  • 0

#22
Retired Tech

Retired Tech

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 20,563 posts
Did you convert the drive to Fat 32

• Clusters cannot be 64 kilobytes (KB) or larger. If clusters were 64 KB or larger, some programs (such as Setup programs) might calculate disk space incorrectly.

• A volume must contain at least 65,527 clusters to use the FAT32 file system. You cannot increase the cluster size on a volume using the FAT32 file system so that it ends up with less than 65,527 clusters.

• The maximum possible number of clusters on a volume using the FAT32 file system is 268,435,445. With a maximum of 32 KB per cluster with space for the file allocation table (FAT), this equates to a maximum disk size of approximately 8 terabytes (TB).

• The ScanDisk tool included with Microsoft Windows 95 and Microsoft Windows 98 is a 16-bit program. Such programs have a single memory block maximum allocation size of 16 MB less 64 KB. Therefore, The Windows 95 or Windows 98 ScanDisk tool cannot process volumes using the FAT32 file system that have a FAT larger than 16 MB less 64 KB in size. A FAT entry on a volume using the FAT32 file system uses 4 bytes, so ScanDisk cannot process the FAT on a volume using the FAT32 file system that defines more than 4,177,920 clusters (including the two reserved clusters). Including the FATs themselves, this works out, at the maximum of 32 KB per cluster, to a volume size of 127.53 gigabytes (GB).

• You cannot decrease the cluster size on a volume using the FAT32 file system so that the FAT ends up larger than 16 MB less 64 KB in size.

• You cannot format a volume larger than 32 GB in size using the FAT32 file system in Windows 2000. The Windows 2000 FastFAT driver can mount and support volumes larger than 32 GB that use the FAT32 file system (subject to the other limits), but you cannot create one using the Format tool. This behavior is by design. If you need to create a volume larger than 32 GB, use the NTFS file system instead.

NOTE: When attempting to format a FAT32 partition larger than 32 GB, the format fails near the end of the process with the following error:

Logical Disk Manager: Volume size too big.
  • 0

#23
kepkorn

kepkorn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 49 posts
wait....what? i dont understand any of that, sorry.
  • 0

#24
Retired Tech

Retired Tech

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 20,563 posts
Did you convert the drive to Fat 32
  • 0

#25
kepkorn

kepkorn

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 49 posts
its already FAT32
  • 0

Advertisements


#26
Retired Tech

Retired Tech

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 20,563 posts
Try here

http://www.short-med...394&postcount=5
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP