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XP or BUST


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#1
justkause

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I have a dell optiplex gx270 that had a clean hard drive. Last night i tried to put XP on it and it took over 12 hours. When it completed the install it just showed a grass hill with a partly cloudy sky, no start bar or any icons. I thought it was the hard drive so i got a 250 gig hard drive and it started to do the same thing. It took 1 hour to format then it started in on arranging files and that went for an hour and hadn't even hit 5 percent on the load bar. It must be something else, ANY IDEAS??
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#2
warriorscot

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Have you tried another XP disk if you can get a copy of a full install disk preferablly sp2 from a friend perhaps and try that. It could be your disk is corrupt or damaged, its possible your optical drive has something wrong with it like a dirty head but it sounds more like something wrong with installation disk if youve allready swapped out the hard drive.
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#3
justkause

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on the boot device menu it says NTLDR is missing whats that??
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#4
justkause

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I found the NTDLR INFO
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#5
WinCrazy

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It sounds like the lens in the optical drive may be dusty/dirty. Here's how to go about cleaning it:
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Inability to read & write any discs is due, most of the time, to one of two causes: A dirty lens in the optics of the drive, or, a bad drive. Dust and dirt can easily make its way into the drive; that includes smoke, too.

Feeling handy ? Cleaning the lens will cost you no money, but requires you to open the computer's case, extract the optical drive, open the cover to the drive and then gently cleaning the tiny lens with a soft cloth or tissue and rubbing alcohol. As far as all tools that you'll need, use a Philips screwdriver.

If you don't feel reasonably comfortable doing this yourself, is there someone you know who could help you with this ? The whole process should take less than a half an hour. This is the kind of thing I love to do - get my hands on the hardware - I bet one of your friends would help you out if you asked. Be reasonably sure he or she is reasonably competent, though.

I'll run through the disassembly-cleaning-reassembly procedure in a moment, but if you decide to simply replace the drive there are top-notch drives for under $50 delivered to your door (USA). (I'm a big fan both of Neweeg.com and NEC optical drives.)

Whether the computer is a laptop or a desktop you really should try cleaning the lens first before giving up on the optical drive and replacing it. If you don't feel comfortable about partially disassembling your machine then take it to a local repair shop for them to do this. They shouldn't charge much to do this. If they want more than $25 then get estimates from other outfits.

Cleaning the lens of an optical drive is actually a straight-forward task that should not be too difficult for anyone that knows how to use a screwdriver.

Laptop drive extraction: Most laptop optical drives slide out from the body of the computer by pushing on an exterior eject button on or by the face of the drive. Its a bit tricky to push this eject button and pull on the drive but you should be able to do this fairly easily. These drives are made to slide out.

Desktop computer procedure: You'll need to open the computer case, remove the drive, open up the drive cover and clean the lens. This routine is only slightly more complicated than replacing the drive with a new one.

-) Turn off the computer and pull out the power cord. Note how all the other cables hook up to the back of the computer so you can replace them when you are finishing up the job (monitor cable, speaker cable, network cable or phone cord, USB device wires)

-) Get the now-cable-free computer box up on a table where you can easily work with it.

-) Remove the left side case panel. If it is a non-OEM computer then opening the left side panel will be very easy. There usually will be either 2 Philips head screws or 2 thumbscrews on the back edge of the left side panel that need to be removed. Remove the screws and then slide the panel toward the rear about a half an inch. You should hear a 'clunk' sound and the panel will be able to be lifted away from the case. Set it aside for now.

If your computer is an OEM Dell, HP, Compaq, Gateway, E-Machines, etc., then opening up the case can be somewhat more difficult. If the case doesn't have 2 screws on the back edge of the case then look for a button on the lower left side of the front of the case. When a case has this cover removal button push it in and pull firmly upward or backward on the left side panel to remove it. If the case doesn't have a panel unlocking button the try sliding it towards the rear of the case. OEM computer manufacturers have used all sorts of weird mechanisms to attach the left side case cover. Some Dells use a clamshell design that pivots the left cover away from the rest of the case. There may be a sliding latch on the rear panel of the case that allows you to put a padlock there to prevent anyone from opening the case. Slide this latch out of its closed position in order to allow the panel to be opened.

I have come across OEM cases that I couldn't figure out how to open. You may have to contact the computer manufacturer to get instructions on how to open it. Opening the case may void your warranty, but it looks like this needs to be done nonetheless.

Once the case is opened remove the power cable and carefully wiggle and pull on the ribbon cable attached the back of the optical drive. There will be either 4 screws or a slide latching mechanism that keeps the drive in place in its holder rack. Remove the screws or push on the latching mechanism's release button and slide the drive out the front of the case.

Opening the laptop or desktop drive cover: In either case there will be 3 or 4 screws on the top panel of the optical drive. Unscrew them and carefully remove the sheet metal panel. I find the mechanism of an optical drive to be fascinating. You will see the lens which appears as a glassy bubble in the middle of the exposed mechanism. Wet your soft cloth or tissue with a little rubbing alcohol. Do not apply so much that it drips. Gently wipe the lens in circular motions to clean the lens. You may not actually notice any dust or dirt come off the lens onto the cloth, but this will clean it.

Now, reassemble the optical drive. You know where its screws are, right ?! Replace the optical drive into its bay. Reattach the ribbon cable and then its power cord. Reattach the case side panel and screw any of its attachment screws back in. Return the computer to its original position. Plug back in each of the cables that you pulled out. Note that the speaker wire plugs into a 1/8 inch socket that is usually colored green - there are usually several 1/8 inch sockets of various colors on the sound card panel. If there are USB cables to plug back in then it shouldn't matter which USB sockets they go into. Finally, plug the power cord back in. Before you start up the computer have a fire extinguisher at hand. Just kidding!

Start up your computer and see if the optical drive works now. If it doesn't work properly or at all then you may need to replace it. Now that you know how to take out the drive, replacing it really is easy. Finding a replacement for a laptop drive might be somewhat more of a challenge.

I hope this procedure doesn't appear to be too daunting. Like I mentioned, take it to a repair shop if it sounds too involved for you or you and a friend to do.
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#6
warriorscot

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Or you could just buy a lense cleaning disk, they are very effective and very cheap for cleaning the lenses of optical drives, most shops with even a smalll electrical section will have them for a couple of quid, you get varying degrees of quality some have several disks with different coatings that can actually repair things like minor scratches.

But really they are so much easier than opening up an optical drive which can be a little tricky and is alot of work for something relativley simple, cheaper than spending money to go to a shop that would use a cleaning disk anyway.
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#7
WinCrazy

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Lens cleaning discs are a hoax. No disc can touch the lens or it would risk scratching it. These discs are a modern form of the floppy drive head cleaning discs that contained a pad instead of magnetic media. However, in floppy drives the actual disk must touch the read-write head in order for it to pass data. Optical disks do not touch, and neither do the "cleaning" discs.

Edited by WinCrazy, 30 April 2006 - 01:12 PM.

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#8
warriorscot

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Have you ever actually seen a proper optical cleaning disk they do work if you get a proper one. Ive seen three or four different variants of the cleaning disk there are a few the most effective slot down into the reader space of the tray, the distance between head and disk is very small on most drives they run very close to the laser head close enough for the pad ones on alot of modern drives, older ones have more bother but its depends on the drive wether those work or not but there are multiple vareities of the disks, they are all quite cheap and mostly effective.

They are also alot safer than opening up optical disk drives which are easily broken due to there delicate nature.

Edited by warriorscot, 30 April 2006 - 01:33 PM.

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#9
troppo

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dont go to the bother of actually opening up the drive its a hassel and as warrior scott said they are tricky.

i pulled one apart from an old system and it went back together fine if you overlook the brocken plastic and the broken plastic tabs. lol
really pulling them apart would be a waste of time

optical drive cleaners have brushes that softly wipe the surface of the optical lens removing the dust and durt from the surface of the lens. this might fix your problem

there are wet and dry type cleaning kits and both are pretty cheap i would suggest trying the cd lense cleaner first then if that doesnt fix the problem then try something more drastic. its not worth destroying your drive IF you do break something.

try that and whilst you are trying that see if you can find another copy of xp and see if you can load that ( obvesily after the lense cleaning)
if that doesnt work then there maybe something else wrong with the system,
goodluck,
troppo
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