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Power supply/wattage?


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#1
Ribeter

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How do I fine out how many watts my processor is putting out?
I'm running a Pentium 4 1.8GHZ.
Is there a site that will tell me if I give it my PC specs or model #?
Trying to add a new video card and want to know if my PC will
handle the extra wattage.
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#2
wannabe1

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Hi Ribeter...

Your processor consumes power rather than produce it. Go to the website for the manufacturer of your machine and look for the specs for your make and model number. If you have difficulties with this, post back with the make and model and I'll see if I can find the information for you.

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#3
SRX660

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The 1.8 GHz Pentium 4 runs at a 1.75V core voltage, the same as all previous Pentium 4's of this particular stepping. Early steppings of the Pentium 4 were rated to run at 1.7V, but were bumped up to 1.75V a few months after. When running at 1.75V, the 1.8 GHz P4 can use up to 66.7 watts of power, which means they'll be a lot of processor heat to deal with.

A good place to read about power supplys is here.

http://jonnyguru.blogspot.com/

Heres a wattage table typical of most computers today.

PC Item Watts
Accelerated Graphics Port (AGP) card 20 to 30W
Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) card 5W
small computer system interface (SCSI) PCI card 20 to 25W
floppy disk drive 5W
network interface card 4W
50X CD-ROM drive 10 to 25W
RAM 10W per 128M
5200 RPM IDE hard disk drive 5 to 11W
7200 RPM IDE hard disk drive 5 to 15W
Motherboard (without CPU or RAM) 20 to 30W
550 MHz Pentium III 30W
600 MHz Athlon 45W

SRX660
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#4
Ribeter

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Pavilion 760n
Model #P632OA

I here that some video cards need up to 300 watt power supply to work.
I want to know if my PC can handle that and what is my PC's watt power supply?
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#5
SRX660

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I have read that the Nvidia top graphics cards use 75 watts in single mode and up to 150 watts in SLI dual card mode. Heres toms hardwares take on power usage of some systems.

http://www.tomshardw...ion/page14.html

I cant seem to find what power supply is in your computer but if its like most H-P's you probably have a 250 watt PS.

The h-p website says you have a 4X agp slot so you can install any graphics card you can find thats 4X. Most of the new AGP cards are still 4X/8X cards. You probably could get by with the factory PS, but if you really want something better look for a 350-400 watt PS that will fit into your case. Many standard ATX PS's will not fit the case on H-P's. Sometimes you can modify the case to make one fit or you can look at the sizes of the PS's and find one that will fit.

SRX660
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#6
Ribeter

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I could have a problem then.
My PS is a ATX 1956D with only 200 watts.
I'm hoping to install a ATI 9800 Pro with 128mb.
Does this sound like a problem?
Do I have to upgrade my PS first and if so what do you suggest?
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#7
wannabe1

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You should definitely look into a new power supply. Herein lies the problem...HP and Compaq both use very proprietory PSU's and you will have to replace it with a power supply designed to work in the machine. Off the shelf power supplies won't work with these machines...you won't be able to use the front panel switches (Power and Reset).

Most computer shops can provide a replacement with a higher output, but be prepared for a bit of sticker shock...they are a bit spendy. You should run at least 350 Watts to fully power your machine with the new video card.

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#8
Ribeter

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So this is something I shouldn't tackle myself?
And you're saying I'll need to purchase a new PSU
from the same PC company?
Do you know a web site where I can look for replacement PSU's?
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#9
wannabe1

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Replacing the power supply is pretty straight foreward...you should be able to do that easily enough.

But...as I stated...the power supply itself is different from those you can buy for other ATX form factor applications. They have a different way of connecting to the front panel and are smaller in size so you must get get one designed for this application. Any local computer store should be able to get one for you if they don't have one in stock.

I googled for a site to get one...didn't find much. A few on eBay. A local computer repair shop is the best bet for getting the one you need.

Edited by wannabe1, 01 May 2006 - 07:35 PM.

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#10
Ribeter

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Thanks for the advice....and I'm off to the store.
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