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HACK-LESS(?)


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#1
grc

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From using a Belarc Analysis, it appears I am not as secure as I could be. How can I change the names of "administrator(s)" and "guest(s)" to be more secure.

THX in advance!

g :whistling: :) :blink: :) :help:

Edited by grc, 03 May 2006 - 08:24 PM.

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#2
dsenette

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To rename the default local Administrator account

1.
Log on as a member of the local Administrators group (but not the built-in Administrator account), and open the Local Users and Groups snap-in tool in the Computer Management console.

2.
In the console tree, expand Local Users and Groups, and then click Users.

3.
In the details pane, right-click Administrator, and then click Rename.

4.
Type the fictitious first and last name, and then press ENTER.

5.
In the details pane, right-click the new name, and then click Properties.

6.
Click the General tab. In the Full name box, type the new full name. In the Description box, delete Built-in account for administering the computer/domain, and then type a description to resemble other user accounts (for many organizations, this value is blank).

7.
Click OK.


do the same for guest
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#3
ZEUS_GB

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Hello grc and welcome to G2G!

You can change user options in user accounts in control panel.
Personally I wouldn't change the administrator username because some things require the administrator account, but to make it more secure I would put a password on it. The password should ideally contain numbers, symbols as well upper and lower case letters. As for the guest account I would set that up with a password and disable it.
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#4
dsenette

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zeus....just as a note here....almost all programs that require there to be an administrator account....verify this account by SID not username..
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#5
ZEUS_GB

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The reason I said to keep the admin account was I had problems using the recovery console. I'd renamed the admin account a few months before and it wouldn't let me login
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#6
Kniht

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Just a suggestion, but you might want to read this:

http://www.microsoft...t/sm0305_2.mspx

Scroll down and read myth # 2.

The safest way to protect the guest account is to make sure it is disabled.
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#7
Kniht

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If you are concerned about someone getting into your PC locally, that is physically sitting down at your PC and hacking into it, then by all means password protect the default Administrator.

As far as hacking in remotely, Windows will not allow access to a blank password account.
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#8
doire

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Kniht


If your surfing the internet do so when logged in as GUEST.

Viruses and other crap thrive on pcs that are logged in as ADMINISTRATOR so i wouldnt go and disbale the GUEST account.

Edited by doire, 04 May 2006 - 08:44 AM.

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#9
Kniht

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doire

Point well taken.

Actually when I surf the Net, I use my browser within a program called "Sandboxie". It's suppose to hold anything nasty put on your PC in a "sandbox" not allowing it out of the sandbox so as to not infect the rest of the system.

I experimented with this claim by going into one of my favorite security testing sites and downloading a "simulated" nasty. At the end of the day when I emptied the "sandbox", a warning message popped up telling me a certain object, located in a certain location in the sandbox could not be deleted.

I went to this location in the sandbox, scanned the object with NOD32, and, by golly, NOD32 detected the "simulated" nasty I had downloaded and cleaned it. I was then able to empty the rest of the sandbox with no further problems.

Sandboxie is kind of like a free, downgraded virtual PC.

I still have my guards up, but feel a little safer surfing within Sandboxie.

Just thought I'd mention this.
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#10
grc

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zeus....just as a note here....almost all programs that require there to be an administrator account....verify this account by SID not username..



Thx, but what is "SID"?

Thx again!
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