Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Python


  • Please log in to reply

#1
Marty L Mayes

Marty L Mayes

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 68 posts
Yes I'm intersted in learning about programing,is python the best to use? and which is the newest version to use,or is there just one version.
thanks
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Hai Mac

Hai Mac

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 260 posts
Hi Mayes,
Ooh, good, I am also learning Python :whistling:. Just visit their site http://www.python.org and simply download the newest package, 2.4.2 I believe. It includes IDLE, a simple, but good enough editor to start with.

:blink: Good luck!
  • 0

#3
Max-T

Max-T

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 50 posts
2.43 is the newest version :whistling: im starting to learn python two. although i have heard it is a little strange but one of my mates recomended it to me instead of pearl so i thought id give it a go
  • 0

#4
Namingishard

Namingishard

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
Python is what i started with, and its still my favorite language, great language to start with ^^ Goodluck.

Please do not include an e-mail address in any post as it could lead to more contact than you intended

Edited by Keith, 17 May 2006 - 02:56 AM.

  • 0

#5
terabyte

terabyte

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 33 posts

is python the best to use?


There is no such thing as best to use...every programing language has its pros and cons...

C lets you work at a systems level and when you need to worry about device drivers communicating with the hardware

Java offers you Microprocessor/machine independant code because it uses a virtual machine (but slow as *bleep* for certain applications)

And I guess Python offers you the ability to write code the way that people write...I've seen courses use Python when the focus was on learning HOW to use programming technqiues and not just learning how to program using the correct syntax of a particular type of prog. language.

Edited by terabyte, 20 May 2006 - 08:36 PM.

  • 0

#6
Marty L Mayes

Marty L Mayes

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 68 posts
Well I have'nt really done much with python yet, I had a look at it and read the first couple of pages,of the introduction. But it seems like it's really hard to get into. I dont know what to do.How do I begin, and what can I make with this program?

Can it be used to make a 3D graphics program,or can I make a Game, or even a new O.S. Even if I read it all will I be able to make somthing work.

It seems like good instructions,but where is the step,by step,how do I learn what strings of data will build a program.

I hope someone can kinda understabnd what I'm trying to say cause I shure dont understand my self.... :whistling: :blink:
  • 0

#7
TaNkZ101

TaNkZ101

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 327 posts
wow i'm also considering learning it. when i have time i'm gonna just google for python tutorials, since the one on python.org seems a bit abstract
  • 0

#8
Hai Mac

Hai Mac

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 260 posts
Wow wow wow, too large projects! Start small and grow bigger. Start out with something really simple as fraction simplifier (my favourite), calculator, simple text editor, slot machine game etc.

Most large projects are written in C, or C++, including Blender3D (http://www.blender.org), which is the best freeware 3D program available (I believe).

And remember, it does not really matter what language you chose to learn programming. It is the abstract thinking that teaches you. The language should only be the bridge between idea and implementation. Most beginner programmers fall into the trap of hoping that they will learn to programme by learning all the keywords, commands etc of a certain language. That's a big no no, read first few tutorials and stop to think: what am I now able to do? Is it possible to do a some kind of program with what I have already learnt?

Good luck :whistling:

Edited by Hai Mac, 21 May 2006 - 07:34 AM.

  • 0

#9
terabyte

terabyte

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 33 posts
Marty,
I would stick to making a very simple text based game and seeing if that works..then I'd slowly move on to bigger and bigger projects...but at a certain point you will realize that one person can't program everything for a program, you need several people in a team combining their code together to make something work...
  • 0

#10
Marty L Mayes

Marty L Mayes

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 68 posts
Thanks for the advice,and I'll try and fry smaller fish,before going deep see fishing,he he...

I'm glad to here eveyones ideas and conserns, this seems to be quite intersting to me, and I want to learn all I can. :whistling:
  • 0

#11
Python380

Python380

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
I wrote a while statement. Its meant to work as a password type program, sort of. Heres what I need to know, if anyone can help.
Is there a way that I can click on a program, like a game, or anything basically, except a web browser. And after I click, or attempt to open that program, it brings up the password program (called test.py) I wrote. Then, you enter the correct pattern of numbers, and it opens the program you orginally attempted to open(whatever it is). If you need it, i don't think you will, heres the script (currently, when you open the program, and after entering the correct sequence of numbers, it opens a game called Pinball, but I can change that):

#/usr/bin/python
# Filename: test.py
#The answer is between 1 and 1000000
number = 498772
running = True
while running:
guess = int(raw_input('Enter an interger, it is between 1 and 1000000 : '))
if guess == number:
print 'Move on to the next level'
running = False
elif guess < number:
print 'Keep Guessing'
else:
print 'Keep Guessing'
else:
print 'Continue'
number = 89683
running = True
while running:
guess = int(raw_input('Enter an interger, it is between 1 and 1,000,000 : '))

if guess == number:
print 'Congrats, you won'
running = False
elif guess < number:
print 'Keep guessing'

import os
os.system('"C:\\Program Files\\Windows NT\\Pinball\\PINBALL.EXE"')
  • 0

#12
Python380

Python380

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
That script I just entered got all screwed up because the post format got rid of all the necessary spaces, ect...., attempting to run that would probably be useless. Also, I'll throw in my two cents...I'm new to programming, and python is simply awesome, exspecially for a starter language, you can even write large programs with it i've heard, though, its probably eaiser to use a C language, but its all up to you, or you skill I spose. Also, python's syntax is similar to Java's and Perl's, although, Python is supposed to be able to do a little more, something along those lines. As far as tutorials, i'm using several, one is called byteofpython, for more info go to www.python.org, and try out the begginers section, some links to tutorials there. lastly, try out using what you learn constantly, thats what I am doing, and its working. Pardon any spelling mistakes please.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP