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Hard Drive Over heating !


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#1
seedless

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Hello I have a 250gig Maxtor that is over heating.

I also have an 80gig WD which has my os on it now the 250 gig is my Storage Drive, itís not used for nothing ells no OS.

Now what im thinking is going on is that, after I formatted my 80gig WD

it messed up my 230 gig Maxtor because I never unplugged it and I actually had to do a recovery on the hard drive to save the files

after I recovered the files off the hard drive I never formatted the drive I jest partitioned it and placed all my data back on it so im thinking thatís why its over heating correct me if im wrong.
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#2
Kemasa

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Air flow or a problem with the disk would be the only reasons I can think which would cause overheating. Some drives have issues with the amount of use, not designed for constant use and that could cause an issue.

You might want to check the air flow/cooling issues with the disk. If it is in the main computer case, make sure that all the fans are working and that all the vents are clean and clear of dust/dirt.
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#3
BlackPandemic

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Also, I know a lot of places sell coolers especially made for Hard Drives. Some are like this:
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16835166013
In which case you mount this rack in an empty slot and it blows air on the hard drive, in turn, keeping it a little cooler.

Then there are enclosures for your hard drive but most of those are loud when on high, and when not on high it would seem that it would make the hard drive hotter...maybe it's just me.

I would look into a bay mounted harddrive cooler personally.
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#4
Mr.Chow

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I'm just curious ... BUT ...

When you buy a hard drive and you have proper airflow in your case is a Hard Drive cooler really necessary ? I mean they do get warm but do they really need to be kept at such a low temp ? I just look at Hard Drive coolers and i think of people who are fan freaks ! The ones who have to have 12 fans for the case ... I duno i just don't see the point ....

Maybe some can inlightin me about this.
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#5
BlackPandemic

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People with 12 fans are just insane. I have 5 case fans which keeps everything below 40*C even when gaming. The problem with a hot hard drive is that the heat (to my knowledge) can eventually lead to corrupted files and eventually, just frying the whole thing, causing total data loss.

And seed, just wondering, how do you know it's overheating?
Does it just shut down?
Do you have a temperature gauge somewhere in your computer?
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#6
Kemasa

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It is not about the number of fans, it is about airflow. If you install 100 fans in a closed box it will not help at all with cooling. You need to get cool air in and hot air out. With a poorly designed case you can end up with air going in and out, but leaving hot spots or not being able to get the airflow needed. One bigger fan, with the right design, can replace many smaller fans, but then noise can be an issue :-).

Heat can lead to failure of electronics. It can also damage it so that it fails later. If you overheat a machine, you can have a higher rate of failure for 3-6 months or so, not just at the time of the overheating condition.

If you have proper airflow, then you don't need to do anything, but the problem is that most PC cases don't have proper airflow. Proper airflow means that all devices in the case get suitable airflow, which is hard to determine unless you monitor everything. Realize that you could have good airflow on one side of a disk and bad on the other and depending on where the sensor is it may not show up.

Within reason, the cooler you keep electronics, the better it is.
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#7
Mr.Chow

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Ahhh ... That is what i wanted to hear thank you Kemasa !
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