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networking - ICS/file/printer sharing


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#1
makihara

makihara

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heya

i have my netgear router 108mbps arriving tomorrow along with a PCI 108mbps card. my laptop has wi-fi capabilities built in.

so the setup would basically be:

internet from wall->cable modem->router->main PC - - - -laptop

-> = wired
--- = wireless

Internet Connection Sharing

am i right in thinking that the internet is broadcast via the router which is picked up by the laptop?
therefore ICS does not require my main PC to have network capabilities in the form of the PCI card??

so, if my router is broadcasting the internet, why can i not have my main PC wirelessy connected to the internet. i.e. why dose the router have to be connected to my main PC with an ethernet cable in order for ICS to work?

If the latop is surfing the internet using the ICS, what, if any files are stored on my main PC as a result of internet sharing. I'm thinking spyware, adware etc type files. I'm guessing though that no info is stored on my computer??

Printer and file sharing

is it also correct that any file or printer sharing can be run through my PCI card and laptop wi-fi connection?

what are the advantages of print servers. They seem to cost a lot when it seems that it can be done simply thtough a basic network.

i'll be using a netgear PCI card and a wi-fi connection on a laptop. I know the router offers protection via MAC address and WPE or whatever. How protected will my shared folders be running simply through the PCI card and the laptop??

If i turn on file sharing, i'm guessing that allows sharing of all folders with sharing enabled. In default Windows XP what folders would be automatically shared if any?

Interference

i have a cordless phone that will be within a metre of my router. How likely is it to cause problems? Should i move the phone even if there aren't any visual problems with ICS.


sorry, i know there are a lot of questions all probably "noob" ones as well.
thanks in advance for any help
makihara
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#2
Neil Jones

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heya

i have my netgear router 108mbps arriving tomorrow along with a PCI 108mbps card. my laptop has wi-fi capabilities built in.

so the setup would basically be:

internet from wall->cable modem->router->main PC - - - -laptop

-> = wired
--- = wireless

Internet Connection Sharing

am i right in thinking that the internet is broadcast via the router which is picked up by the laptop?
therefore ICS does not require my main PC to have network capabilities in the form of the PCI card??


You don't need Internet Connection Sharing, this is for if you wanted the laptop to use the PC's internet connection. What you want is for the laptop to go on the internet through the router in the same way the PC will be. You will need an ethernet connection which your PC probably already has or if not, will be provided by the card you've just bought.

All you need do is plug your PC into the router, tell the router to broadcast wirelessly, set everything up and off you go.

so, if my router is broadcasting the internet, why can i not have my main PC wirelessy connected to the internet. i.e. why dose the router have to be connected to my main PC with an ethernet cable in order for ICS to work?


There is nothing stopping you from having a wireless connection from your PC to the router as well as or instead of a wired connection. In theory it is possible to do ICS through wireless but as I say you don't need to worry about this.

If the latop is surfing the internet using the ICS, what, if any files are stored on my main PC as a result of internet sharing. I'm thinking spyware, adware etc type files. I'm guessing though that no info is stored on my computer??


None. Just the settings that would tell Windows to look at the PC to log on and share. Now you have a router, Windows is set up by default to talk to routers out of the box.

Printer and file sharing

is it also correct that any file or printer sharing can be run through my PCI card and laptop wi-fi connection?


Yes. It works wirelessly too.

what are the advantages of print servers. They seem to cost a lot when it seems that it can be done simply thtough a basic network.


Designed primarily for businesses where lots of people could potentially be using them, in departments or various wings or whatever where it woud be more cost effective to maintain one printer as opposed to fifty.

i'll be using a netgear PCI card and a wi-fi connection on a laptop. I know the router offers protection via MAC address and WPE or whatever. How protected will my shared folders be running simply through the PCI card and the laptop??


Set protection up and change the default workgroup. Beyond that it's not all that obvious to most users how to find out what's on the network. And of course, only share stuff that isn't too big a deal for others to leech off - never share a folder with text files in them that contain bank details for example.

In all honesty though, anybody who wants to leech off a network wil usually only bother with the ones belonging to companies and what not where it's worth the while to get in and cause havoc - most domestic wireless networks are just internet access and nothing else.

If i turn on file sharing, i'm guessing that allows sharing of all folders with sharing enabled. In default Windows XP what folders would be automatically shared if any?


By default everything in All Users -> Documents is shared out of the box between all users (hence the name) but nothing by default unless you tell otherwise.

Interference

i have a cordless phone that will be within a metre of my router. How likely is it to cause problems? Should i move the phone even if there aren't any visual problems with ICS.


Depends on the frequency range of the phone and the cordless. If it is going to be an issue between the router and the base, the router you can change the channel number. But even then this technology isn't as fickle as it used to be so there probably won't be anything to worry about.
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#3
makihara

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thanks for the repsonse. your speediness is also much aprreciated.

so it looks like i got confused with ICS. i can ignore the help guide located here then:
http://www.geekstogo...showtopic=92406

and i will use this one instead:
http://www.geekstogo...howtopic=102163

so i would just like to confirm:

the router will broadcast an internet signal. The router is connected to my main PC.The laptop or another PC can recieve this signal and connect to the internet.

Lets say i want to move the main PC away from the cable modem and router.

can i then use my PCI card in my main PC to access the internet via the router along with the laptop?

Last Question topic - Internet Speeds

Lets say my router is connected straight to my main PC via ethernet cables. No other computer is using the internet signal. I'm therefore guessing my internet speed on my main PC will be as fast as it would be without the router.

Lets say the laptop is downloading a file at 10Kb/s. Will the internet on my main PC be slowed down by a similar amount?

my internet speed is usually around 400Kb/s. the netgear router and cards are like 108Mbps. Since the wireless transfer is way faster than my internet connection speeds would my main pc experience the same internet connection wirelessly as it would wired??


EDIT - just remembered a quick little question

does my computer know the difference between an internet conenction via a router or with no router??

i was thinking that if the router stopped working for some reason i could just remove it from the loop and browse the internet with no erorr messages popping up. Once the routers fixed i could then re-add it to the loop and surf wirellessly once more.

thanks again
makihara

Edited by makihara, 22 May 2006 - 04:43 AM.

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#4
Neil Jones

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the router will broadcast an internet signal. The router is connected to my main PC.The laptop or another PC can recieve this signal and connect to the internet.

Lets say i want to move the main PC away from the cable modem and router.

can i then use my PCI card in my main PC to access the internet via the router along with the laptop?


Yes. Just buy a longer piece of cable or replace it with a wireless card.

Last Question topic - Internet Speeds

Lets say my router is connected straight to my main PC via ethernet cables. No other computer is using the internet signal. I'm therefore guessing my internet speed on my main PC will be as fast as it would be without the router.


As fast as the internet connection.

Lets say the laptop is downloading a file at 10Kb/s. Will the internet on my main PC be slowed down by a similar amount?


Only if you're actively downloading at the time. If you're just reading web pages and not physically downloading anything huge, you won't notice a thing as the download of the page will have happened so quickly as to not adversely affect the download speed on the other system. The faster the connection the less chance of this happening to a noticeable degree.

All a router does is route traffic, it'll therefore split the internet speed between as many computers as it needs. For two computes downloading at the same time, the slowdown won't be all that noticeable even on 512k.

my internet speed is usually around 400Kb/s. the netgear router and cards are like 108Mbps. Since the wireless transfer is way faster than my internet connection speeds would my main pc experience the same internet connection wirelessly as it would wired??


108Mbps is the speed of the connection between your computer and the router. Unless your physical internet connection is faster than 108Mb, you won't be using the extra bandwidth anyway. I'm assuming your 400K figure means you're on 512k broadband so you didn't actually need a 108Mb bandwidth card but never mind.

does my computer know the difference between an internet conenction via a router or with no router??

i was thinking that if the router stopped working for some reason i could just remove it from the loop and browse the internet with no erorr messages popping up. Once the routers fixed i could then re-add it to the loop and surf wirellessly once more.


Windows doesn't care what's providing the connection, though it does favour the LAN/Ethernet connection where available. So if you have wireless and wired plugged in, Windows will usually try to go wired first regardless of whatever else is available.
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#5
makihara

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well thanks a huge amount for clearing up pretty much everything i need to know. absolutely amazing.

I'm assuming your 400K figure means you're on 512k broadband so you didn't actually need a 108Mb bandwidth card but never mind.


When i said 400kb/s i was talking typical download speed results (achieved through bittorrent mostly which of course is affected by other factors). According to internet speed tests i'm on around 1.4 Mb/s.
I know that it still would have therefore surficed to have a 54 mbps card but the singal strength is what i'm after with the faster one. Plus i have a lot of video and audio content on my PC which which i'd like to be able to transfer quickly.


oh dear, i'm really sorry but that just reminded me about another question. :whistling:
at some point i'll stop...sorry

signal strength

obviously singal strength is affected by physical barriers and even the properties of these barriers. I'm in quite a quaint victorian british house with stupidly thick walls made of apparently dense stuff.

so anyway, am i right in thinking that there is a correlation between speed and strength??
on the technical specifications of most routers, a specific distance is never quoted. I mean apparently the 108mbps router is far. could you hint at any distances for me, i mean i could only guess like 50m or something, i just don't have a clue.

thanks ever so much again,
james
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#6
Neil Jones

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Wireless throttles itself according to the quality of the signal between the router and the aerial. The transmission range of a router is generally printed in the manual somewhere - mine goes up to 900ft apparently which I believe is about average for these things.

You shall have to suck it and see, and if wireless isn't satisfactory from the areas of the house you're working in, the only thing you can do is lay down more cable or, where possible, reposition the router to as central a location as possible. One can buy broadband cable by the meter length as needs decree so you can run it from the nearest phone line to wherever the best router position is.

You can go down the repeater route as well (signal relay sort of things) but these are quite often more trouble than they are worth, plus its usually quicker just to move the router and lay more cable down.
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#7
makihara

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ok thanks

all the kit arrives tomorrow so i hope it will all go well.

i feel awful that i just take advantage of your knowledge but if its worth anything i really appreciate it as im sure many others do.

see you around and thanks a load
James Harper
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