Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Return of The Computer that Wouldn't Boot


  • Please log in to reply

#31
DirePenguin

DirePenguin

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
I think you might be right. Would a bad power supply cause file corruption and trap exception errors too? Makes sense that it would be causing the computer to not boot if it was I guess.

Anyway, no, I don't have a handy power supply. I'm not yet geek enough to have spare parts around (or rich enough :whistling:).
  • 0

Advertisements


#32
wannabe1

wannabe1

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 16,645 posts
A failing power supply can cause all kinds of wierd problems...lagging, hangs, read/write errors, and the classic no monitor/no signal problem. Being in your shoes, that's where I'd start. I usually recommend at least 400 Watts and buy the best you can afford.
  • 0

#33
DirePenguin

DirePenguin

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
I'm going to be replacing this computer in just a few months though - buying parts and building it from scratch. Also I'm on a tight budget (7 bucks an hour tight). In my shoes, do you have a particular power supply you'd recommend me? Basicly something cheap and solid - nothing fancy. The computer is pretty old so... I'd give you my mobo stats but alas, I can't get on the desktop to find them.

20 gig Hard Drive
1.4 ghz Pentium 4
640 MB RDRAM
32 mb Nvidia GeForce 2 graphics card

just to give you an idea of its age. (it came with 128 MB of RAM)
  • 0

#34
wannabe1

wannabe1

    Tech Staff

  • Technician
  • 16,645 posts
Antec makes a good PSU for the price. ThermalTake also makes some affordable power supplies that are rock solid.
  • 0

#35
DirePenguin

DirePenguin

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
Ok, both of those companies offer some PSUs that are within my budget - how do I know which one fits my computer the best?
  • 0

#36
DirePenguin

DirePenguin

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
What do I need to know to purchase a PSU that is compatable with my system?
  • 0

#37
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
May I suggest, just before you buy a new psu:

The problems could be also the result of a badly corrupted BIOS. To make sure that this not the case: Unplug the computer from the wall socket. Open the box and carefully pull out the round, silvery, button battery. Keep it out for 20 minutes and reinstall in the reverse order. If it works at all it should give you a checksum error which will disappear after you set time and date.

If this doesn't help try to borrow a psu from a friend. It takes only few minutes to replace psus and it will give you a definitive answer about whether the problem is there. You don't want to spend the money and discover that the problem is not there. Replacing the psu is a good advice but keep in mind that the problems could also be the result of a faulty motherboard, cpu etc.
  • 0

#38
DirePenguin

DirePenguin

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
Thank you Skeptic. I'll do that right now.

Still, how do I know what PSUs are compatable with what systems?
  • 0

#39
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
Any PSU will do for the test as long as it is rated above 300-350watt. Basicall all deskop psus fit into a standard (ATX form factor) computer box. If you find that the problem is with the power supply I would recommend a new one with 450-500 watts. By the way, where I live, the vast majority of replaced psus are generic and cost about 17$ apiece for a 500watt product. Some people will grumble at this suggestion but belieave me that in most cases they work as good as any fancy named product, giving you stable voltage within 5% or less then specified.
  • 0

#40
DirePenguin

DirePenguin

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
The battery is in a circular plastic "bowl" and is wedged in pretty tight. There doesn't seem to be a place that I can get a grip on it to remove it.

UPDATE: Got it... that was annoying - had to use tweezers for leverage. :\

Edited by DirePenguin, 26 May 2006 - 02:03 PM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#41
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
Yes you can. If you look carefully you will note that one side of the "bowl is" a metal strip that push the bettery to the other side, tucking it under two teath that keep it in place. Carefully use a thin screwdriver to push the metal strip backwards. This will release the battery. Don't forget to unplug the computer. When replacing the battery the positive (+) should be on top.
  • 0

#42
DirePenguin

DirePenguin

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
Done and done. Battery replaced and still no change.
  • 0

#43
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
Go ahead with the psu, if you can.
  • 0

#44
DirePenguin

DirePenguin

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
Question:

I know what I need my PSU to have, all except one connection.

It's four wires in a square formation, like so
__ __
|__|__|
|__|__|

with no covering, connected to the motherboard right next to the fan.

I'd say it looks like an uncovered PCI connect except that it's connected to the mobo next to the fan and not the graphics card - the graphics card doesn't have an apparent connection though, so maybe it's running the PCI power through the motherboard?
  • 0

#45
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
All modern psus have this connector which supplies 12 volt to the motherboard. However, many old motherboards do not make use of it, having no connector onboard. In this case you leave it disconnected. If you have this connector on the motherboard you must use it otherwise the system will be unstanle or not work at all.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP