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Self-Filling Harddrive


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#1
JasperC84

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Good morning everybody,

a few weeks ago I ran into the problem of not having enough free space on my hard drive. The hard part is as following: "When I take the sum of all files present on my hard drive, it does not add up to the total amount of space used according to the system. Where has this space gone and how can I reclaim this?

The specs for the hard drive:
IMB-DTLA-305040
Split in 4 parts of: 9,3; 9,3; 9,3; 10,3 GB

The last three portions are fine, the problem only concerns the first part. Thanks for your support!
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#2
austin_o

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Hi and welcome to Geeks to Go. System restore requires hard drive space. I suspect your missing space is there.
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#3
Samm

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austin_o is right, the system restore will account for a large chunk of space. So will the swap file (virtual memory) as well as a few other hidden system files possibly. The size of the available free disk space may also be affected by how badly fragmented the drive is.
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#4
JasperC84

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I looked for some of the suggested possibilities and this is what I found:

Windows XP Professional
Filling: Fat32
Clustersize: 8 kb
Clusters: 1.248.342.620
Files: 60.860

HD SIZE: 9,30 GB (9.986.740.960 bytes)
"USED" 8,89 GB (9.546.465.280 bytes)
FREE: 0,43 GB ( 445.661.184 bytes)
USED: 6,70 GB (7.205.097.263 bytes)
USED on HD: 7,00 GB (7.516.372.992 bytes)

MISSING: 2,17 GB (2.249.034.347 Bytes)
SWAP FILE SIZE: 0,39 GB

The fragmantation of the drive only cost a few kb per fragment, that was whenn the fragmentation was made, I don't know if this might have "grown". Can you tell me where I can find the space or files of the system restore, and can I reclaim this space or delete does files? Thanks!
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#5
Retired Tech

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Click start, all programmes, accessories, system tools, disc clean up, click more options, click clean up restore points, click yes, put the cursor over OK and wait till the hourglass goes, click OK, confirm, reboot

Check the disc space
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#6
Neil Jones

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Good morning everybody,

a few weeks ago I ran into the problem of not having enough free space on my hard drive. The hard part is as following: "When I take the sum of all files present on my hard drive, it does not add up to the total amount of space used according to the system. Where has this space gone and how can I reclaim this?


When you save files on a computer system, it sits on what is known as a cluster.

Under Windows, each cluster has a certain fixed size depending on the size of the disk. The problem comes when you or any other program saves something to a cluster that doesn't fill that entire cluster.

So for example, your cluster size is 8 kilobytes. If you was to open Notepad, type one character and then save it on your hard drive, that 1 byte file would be saved to a cluster and therefore take up 8k of the hard drive. Nothing else can use that cluster until its empty, therefore 8,191 bytes have been wasted.

Across your hard drive as a whole, this sort of thing happens regularly where clusters aren't filled up. It's a necessary evil in order to be able to store data on hard drives. It's this behaviour (which is intended) that means you end up with two different figures for how much space is being used/available on the drive.

You can always convert the drive to NTFS to bring the cluster size down to 4 kilobytes, but it wouldn't regain you much in the way of space.
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