Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Need to add fan; Processor getting too hot


  • Please log in to reply

#1
PuffGussy36

PuffGussy36

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 68 posts
System info (partly gathered using TuneUp Utilities System Info)
Processor is Pentium4 2.0 GHz 478 socket (L2 512 KB)
Board: Intel D845HV
Form factor: Gateway MFATXSTL ELP Performance 1500
Memory: 1.28 GB PC133 SDRAMM
Card: MSI Radeon 9550 Secondary (does this mean my board might have an integrated graphics chipset?)
Display mode: 1027 x 768 32 bit color depth.

I'm running Windows XP Home Service Pack 2. I'm also running Intel Active Monitor. This computer was given to me by a friend. It was one he had thrown together so I do not think my board is the one originally housed in 1500. As this machine has a better processor, more memory, more storage space, and a better video card than my previous tower, I re-installed an old favorite: Ghost Recon (with patch and both jungle and desert expansions).

I upped all the graphics settings to the highest level and began to play. It ran and looks better than it ever has. The only problem is Intel Active Monitor keeps telling me my Processor Zone and Sytem Zone 1 are getting too hot (they are currently at 37 and 30 degrees Celsius respectively). I did a little research to be sure the 68/50 sensor thresholds were correct for my processor type and they are. Which is to say Active Monitor isn't over reacting. My heat sink fan and system fan seem to be running fine.

Should I add another fan? Should I get a better heat sink and/or heat sink fan than I have? I don't understand how, with a better card and processor, the same old game is suddenly putting so much stress on my system. My new tower is in the same place my old one was with nothing against eaither side. Even if I try running it with one of the case sides off it still gets too hot during the game. The circular honeycomb vent on the back of the tower that normally has a fan blowing out of it does not. Could that be the simple answer? There are definitely mounting screws for a fan there.

Solutions, especially affordable ones, would be greatly appreciated. Also, let me know if you need any more information on the situation. Thanks.

Edited by PuffGussy36, 28 May 2006 - 08:48 AM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Samm

Samm

    Trusted Tech

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,476 posts
If the thresholds are correct (i.e 68/50), then why are your current temps of 37 & 30 too hot? Have I missed a meeting?
  • 0

#3
BlackPandemic

BlackPandemic

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 678 posts
Why you worried? My hard drive is at 40 tops and cpu is at 36 tops. I don't see why you are worried at all considering the temp would have to double in order to be anywhere close to trouble. You're pretty much fine.
  • 0

#4
Gamerlicious

Gamerlicious

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 99 posts
Speaking of overheating, I have a prebuilt Gateway, and when I checked the BIOS the overheat shutdown temperature was set to 90 degrees celcius. Wouldn't everything be fried at 90? Anyway I lowered the shutdown temp to 80 degrees. That's as low as it goes.
  • 0

#5
Neil Jones

Neil Jones

    Member 5k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,476 posts
Probably set to 90 degrees because whenever those temperatures are hit the system just shuts off with no warning. Systems have been known to reach 80 degrees in cases with poor cooling and when the system is under heavy load. I did manage to push mine to 69 degrees once under load (and in the summer) - usually idles around 40.
  • 0

#6
Gamerlicious

Gamerlicious

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 99 posts
My PC is always under pretty heavy load. It's common for me to run World of Warcraft, Windows Media Player, multiple Firefox windows, Soulseek, Limewire, Msn messenger, Yahoo messenger, Ventrilo, and live protection for virus and spyware all at the same time. I was thinking of buying a better fan from newegg.com, but since it's a prebuilt I don't know how good my current fan is. So then I don't know if I'd really be buying a better one or not.
  • 0

#7
BlackPandemic

BlackPandemic

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 678 posts
First of all, this is Puffgussys post and we haven't heard back from him/her yet, only from gamer who started his own thread.

Secondly, you don't need a new fan, you need to learn when to turn crap off. You don't NEED limewire on, you don't NEED those multiple Firefox windows open while playing games or anything. There's this little box in the top right, it has an x in it...try that once in a while :whistling:
  • 0

#8
memberix

memberix

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 160 posts
The maximal operatin temperature for your CPU is 75C to 80C degrees.
37C ain't hot at all. You CPU is safe and cool. You should be cool too.
  • 0

#9
PuffGussy36

PuffGussy36

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 68 posts
Ok whoa hold on folks - when I said "currently running" I meant as I was typing. During gameplay it was hitting 67 degrees C. Does every time. And (Black Pandemic) that is with NO other apps running - I even set my desktop to black (no fancy wallpaper) and I'm NOT running Firefox so nyah. :whistling:

I added a rear system fan but it did no good (did I mention that already?). I think it might be my heat sink. On of it's clips are broken and it might not be making appropriate contact. I guess until I correct that issue I won't know for sure if it is something else.

Memberix - where did you get 75/80? Intel's own active threshold monitor app has the defaults at 68/50. Are they just being conservative? That would be great because I can adjust those thresholds.

Ghost Recon brings the temp up to 67 but it DOES level off there. If that temp isn't going to crash my PC, I'll play on. I've been shutting the game down because I've been getting a warning message from Intel Active Monitor saying my CPU is too hot.
  • 0

#10
BlackPandemic

BlackPandemic

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 678 posts
So you bought a rear fan correct? Are there any other fans in the case? You'll want to make sure that if there is only one fan, you got one with a good amount of air being blown, and that it blows INTO your computer. If it's running as an exhaust with nothing pushing air into the case, it won't do much good.

Another question is, what is your power supply? If your power supply is not pumping out enough wattage for your new hardware and all, things will get very hot and possibly fail.
  • 0

#11
Samm

Samm

    Trusted Tech

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,476 posts
PuffGussy36 - I think it's safe to assume that the major cause of your overheating problems is going to be the heatsink clip. The heatsink is supposed to exert x number of pounds (can't remember exact figure but it's a lot) of pressure on the cpu, in order to cool it effectively. If one of the clips is broken, then it won't be doing this.

Until you replace the heatsink or clip, I don't think there's much point in looking for other causes. When you do replace it, remember to remove all traces of the old thermal compound & replace it with fresh stuff (assuming you only replace the clip). If replacing the entire HSF assembly, then the new heatsink should come with fresh thermal compound anyway.

Re. the thresholds set by Intel - 68C for the cpu is a conservative, i.e safe, upper limit. The cpu should be able to withstand higher temps than this. However, constant overheating beyond this safe limit is likely to shorten the cpu's life expectancy.
  • 0

#12
PuffGussy36

PuffGussy36

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 68 posts
Samm, BlackPandemic

Thank you both. I have three fans. I added a rear exhaust fan but I do not have an intake on the front (not sure if I can fit one). I've got a fan on my CPU and one above it (on the 'ceiling' of the case) that actually blows out the back. I think that is cooling where the power cord connects. Should I flip the rear exhaust fan in or just try fixing the HSF? I'm not sure what my power supply is but I've attached a screen shot of what my monitor says.

I think I'll look into correcting the HSF assembly and see if that is it. Even the friend who built this machine (knowing that semi-broken clip might be a problem) says that what he thinks it is.

Attached Files


  • 0

#13
Samm

Samm

    Trusted Tech

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,476 posts
The fan you described by the power cord is the PSU fan.

I agree - sort out the HSF first before doing anything else.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP