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SOVLED (for now) Bootup problem Laptop Toshiba TE 2000


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#1
digikiwi

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Having just solved my Network problems, it looks like my laptop has just keeled over and died. I get absolutely nothing when I try to start up the machine, not even a post test. The AC power supply light comes up and that is it. Nothing else.

My question: What diagnostic tests can I conduct to find the problem. If it's the mainboard then I'll have to replace, but maybe it is something worth fixing.

Update: after a few minutes it did start up with a balck screen saying : Warning Resume Failure. It is working again for the moment but I want to know what the problem is, if/when it might reoccur and how to fix it.

Further update:

It starts quite intermittently, more off than on.

I recently added a reg key : DWORD - IPRStackSize which reenabled my network. Seems unlikely to be related though. However there are all kinds of messages going off in systems event viewer. I could post a log of this if it helps.

I've had success starting it up by removing AC power, thus initiating startup off the battery (which is 4 years old like the computer and pretty much stuffed) and then re- plugging in AC power.

However a new battery costs way too much from Toshiba...

I'm eyeing up a couple of broken lapotops on a local auction site to salvage for parts, but first I need to find what is wrong...


How can I go about diagnosing the problem?

Cheers

Digikiwi

Any help is appreciated greatly

Edited by digikiwi, 27 June 2006 - 06:24 PM.

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#2
greyknight17

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There are two possible causes for this.

1. Battery
2. System Board

Try it without the battery...or at least plug in the power adapter to be sure it's not the battery. Does that Warning Resume Failure message still come up? Even with just adapter and no battery?

If so, then it might be the system board (motherboard).
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#3
digikiwi

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Hi Greyknight,

thanks for looking into this.

I've tried removing the battery, but in terms of starting up I seem to have more luck when it is inserted. I'm guessing for system board too. There must be some sort of diagnostics that can be carried out. Preferably software and failing that opening the beasty up (but that is a last resort - I'd be learning how to do it as I went).

The "warning resume" message only came on at the first restart after initial crash. I have managed to start it up another 4-5 times and am now keeping it running in case it ceases to start next time.

Digikiwi
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#4
digikiwi

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In trying to live up to my signature - here's what I found:

This is apparently a common design fault in the Toshiba TE2000 and TE2100 series. The dry solder joints to the power board can crack due to pressure of the abovelying mouse buttons. Unfortunately the fix requires dismantling of the laptop and some trickyish soldering (I haven't tried it myself yet). The link below explains what to do

http://forums.whirlp...cfm/499023.html

and most helpfully this link below gives an excellent pictorial walkthrough guide on dissembling a TE2100 (can anyone confirm that the TE2000 is basically the same design/layout albeit with less features (eg no built in Wifi).

http://irisvista.com...craTE2100_3.htm

The fix, IMO, is best attempted by a technician or serious geek - but hey we're here to learn right...?
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#5
greyknight17

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If you don't know how to solder, I suggest not even attempting it. You will need a steady hand and one of those very fine tipped solderers for this task.

Take a look at the laptop you have now. Are the outside screws similar to the one shown in that site? They should be a little bit different at the very least since it's another model. Have to tell you one thing though. Try to keep everything in it's own area (screws and parts). Putting it back will be worse if you forgot what goes where...Since all the parts are small, use "light" force when removing any part inside.

If you can, have your local computer shop fix it. See how much it costs and decide whether it's worth it. If it's just a soldering job, it shouldn't cost as much as if it was to replace the whole motherboard.
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#6
digikiwi

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So I managed to take the laptop apart (clearly labeling and bagging parts and screws on the way. The advice on laptopfreak.com suggested reseating the power board might fix it but did not. So I am again considering the solder fix recommended on whirlpool "(see my previous post). This suggests remelting the solder to fix any broken links, without adding any solder to it.

I have taken a good lock at the underside of the motherboard where the solder droplets for the connector pins sit. One of these seems fairly bereft of solder and might be the problem. I'll take a pic as soon as I can borrow a camera with a good zoom.

Thanks for the advice on not lunging in like a bull in a china shop - I agree wholeheartedly. But I also believe you don't know what you can't do till you try (while taking every possible precaution).

Any thoughts on whether that pin might be the problem or other advice on how to find out?

Digikiwi
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#7
greyknight17

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Yep, always good to learn something new. Soldering comes in very handy in a lot of cases.

What's wrong with that pin? If it's just sticking out a little, it should be ok as long as nothing on the top part is damaged.
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#8
digikiwi

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:whistling: I was looking in the wrong place - wrong connector. I managed to get the laptop going again by cleaning and ensuring a snug fit between the "right" connectors joining the power and motherboards. I've pasted the details below in case anyone else has similar problems. Hopefully I'm in the clear and won't have to revisit this issue :blink:

Thanks for the learning curve and support Greyknight17

Digikiwi


From the other forum:

A mighty tip of the hat to you Sir Reubes. Once I realised which connector you meant I took a closer look. The idea of soldering it scared the Bejesus out of me as it is very small indeed (I've only soldered microphone plugs and the like). However on inspection through a magnifying glass I saw some gunk on the channels and air brushed it off.

I reseated the power board, paying close attention to there being a snug fit for this connector between mother and power boards. Test run with RAM inserted and success!!

I rebuilt the laptop and on the first boot a CMOS error came up. I rebooted again and went into BIOS by pressing F1. Without changing settings I hit esc to exit and it booted up fine.

It seems to be starting regularly now but if the problem reoccurs I'll know where to look.

For anyone wanting to try taking their lappy apart follow the instructions in irisvista.com/tech/lapto...ecraTE2100_2.htm

I'll write up what differences you can expect in a TE 2000 on that site
www.laptoprepairguy.com/...100-boot-problem

Good luck yo'all and thanks again Reubes

Digikiwi


http://forums.whirlp...amp;p=-1#bottom
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#9
greyknight17

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No problem Digikiwi. Thanks for the followup :whistling:

So it was as simple as reseating everything and the bootup issue is gone?
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#10
digikiwi

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Fortunately, yes. I did put a lot of effort into creatively visualising a solder-free solution though :whistling:

I didn't realise the quote in my last post didn't have active links, so for anyone wanting closer details look here.
You'll find details of how the TE2000 differs from the TE2100 which has a photo guide on taking it apart. I've listed which steps are different and highlighted the step which provided my fix in the comments (#73)

Digikiwi
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#11
mik4miyu

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I also had restarting problems with my te2000.
reseating the power board fixed the problem initially but it returned again a few months later.

I recently posted my 'solder free' solution in whirlpool in the forum mentioned above. If you are not confident to solder and and the problem recurs this should help:

qoute from whirlpool:

I didn't resolder, however this has solved the problem:

pic1

pic2

I used a spit pin
plastic tubing (actually a guide tube from an accupuncture needle, pvc aquarium tubing would probably suffice. Soft enough not to damage the components)

two B12 screws (There are three on the back of the computer. I use the one closest to the rear of the computer and one of the other two which holds down the plate at the top of the keyboard.) Ideally these should be replaced although It seems secure enough not to bother.

I found this holds the connector to the mainboard very securely and stops all flex.

Resoldering the connectors is definitely the best repair. Securing the connector like this may help stop the problem occurring again.

note-- be careful not to over tighten. I think just enough pressure to eliminate the flex is the go.

Technically, it is not the best to be placing pressure on the surface mount components as is the case with my fix. If you are concerned about this you could use a suitable 'pack' in the centre which is directly above the connector and free of components.

I hope this comes in handy for someone. Particularly if your not confident in soldering surface mount.

good luck

Edited by mik4miyu, 05 October 2006 - 11:27 PM.

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