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Sound Card and RAM questions


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#1
Phillios

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Can anyone out there tell me what the diffrence between RAM and Performance RAM is?:whistling:

Also does anyone know what the latency is like when using VST synths through a Delta 1010??

Thanks
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#2
Mitesh

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U say what? RAM and Perfomance RAM? Unless you mean the normal consumer RAM and the Enthuasisast RAM. As for Lyst and all of that I dont understand what on earth that is.
Diffrences are latency timing and the expensive perfomance ones have been tested thouroughly so you dont end up with a dead one so better reliablility.
Her I will explain a few things:

RAM

DDR- Dual Data Rate. DDR is an improvment over SDRAM.
SDRAM reads once per cycle whilst DDR reads twice per cycle.
PC3200 etc refers to the bandwith.

DDR2- Essentially, it improves upon DDR by reading data at four times over a clock cycle. Other improvements include running at a lower voltage and hence a lower power, manufacturing at higher densities for larger memory capacities, and operating at higher clock speeds. This all sounds good, and it looks like a worthy successor, but it has this one downfall that pretty much defeats the speed gains: high latency. In order to achieve higher memory speeds, higher latency is introduced to provide a more stable operation (higher latency also occurs with larger chips). Latency specs are given as four numbers e.g. 4-4-4-12, and are given for a rated memory speed

Dual Channel- A technology developed soon after DDR was introduced, dual channel refers to increasing the bandwidth available even more by using pairs of DDR or DDR2 modules. Ideally, the two memory modules should be of the same brand and speed or basically the same everything (identical). Dual channel is actually a capability of the motherboard and not the RAM itself. Essentially, it doubles the available bus width, so the system accesses two channels at the same time versus one channel previously. As with all memory bandwidth, doubling it does not mean doubling performance. It only means that the bottleneck in the system is reduced i.e. there is more bandwidth available should the system activity require it.

Latency Timings- given as (this is an example) 4-4-4-12. Lower is better.

If FSB is say 800Mhz then DDR 400Mhz is the ideal RAM (actual clock speed is 200 Mhz)

Require- Unbuffered (Not registered)
Non-ECC
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#3
daniel_c

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RAM and RAM are the same thing you can get different types of rams listed abouve.
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#4
MNOB07

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"Performance" RAM is nothing but a marketing term. While faster RAM may make it easier to overclock, generally going from regular RAM to high end RAM is one of the least gratifying upgrades.
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#5
Samm

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Also does anyone know what the latency is like when using VST synths through a Delta 1010??


The latency (the delay between midi input & the output of the sound card) with M-audio's Delta cards is almost zero if you use a hardware synth. This latency will be slightly higher is using software based synth in Windows - VST sets it's latency to match the sound cards latency, so should be very low in the case of the delta 1010. From what I understand though, the latency can also be affected by the sound cards driver, so some drivers will result in lower latancy than others. It can be affected by the sound cards configuration - e.g smaller buffers = lower latancy

For windows, the best audio driver standard for lowest latency are ASIO drivers. With ASIO its possible to get the latency as low as 1ms
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