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Adding Memory


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#1
Pluto56

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Hi people. This may sound very academic to most of you, but I'm thinking my computer needs some added memory. I've run the TuneUp application, and that is one of it's recommendations in it's system analysis. And I have noticed lately that it is slowing down (not malware either, had it checked by an expert). I've done a lot of program and utility addins lately, and it's eating up available memory I think.

Currently this Dell has 256 RAM. 80 G hardrive. Pentium 4 2.8 ghz

I've never played around much with the "guts" of a computer, so this is my question.

Is adding memory as simple as buying another 256mb card and putting it in the second slot? If adding a second 256 card, should it match the original? Or do I buy one 512 card and replace the existing 256? Do I have to do anything other than that? Tell the system anything? Or let it recognize the upgrade? Help! No hardware expert here.

Thanks in advance!

:whistling:
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#2
rddg

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Windows XP, and your startup programs will suck up a lot of that before you ever do anything. Gotta have more.
For starters, at the very least, add another 256 chip, or for a few bucks more than that, a 512 chip. Replace the
old 256 w/ the 512, and put the 256 over in the next slot. This outta do you for normal usage, you should notice
a big difference. Past that, its just whatever you wanna spend. P.S. im not sure about newer computers, I think
onboard graphics now come with on board memory as well, but your next best bang for the buck, probably would be
installing a graphics card. And a 10,000 rpm hard-drive is a often overlooked performance booster.(a big bottleneck
is a cheap old harddrive the manufacturer may stick you with while screaming about ram and graphics)

P.S- Just stick the RAM in and restart. Nothing more. If you have much static (dry climate etc)leave the plug in, to drain off any static through the ground wire.

Edited by rddg, 04 July 2006 - 02:18 PM.

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#3
Pluto56

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Thanks rddg. Was looking at Dell's website for memory upgrade. A 512 card is about $60 with shipping. Didn't think that sounded too bad. And from what I've read there, simply take out the other one, plug that in, that's it. Plug and play in other words.

Using the TuneUp utility, I've tweaked my startup menu, but some things just won't allow themselves to be taken off of it. Like Yahoo Messsenger and Windows Messenger. Of course, Windows Messenger is embedded in Windows. Everything else is behaving. And Yahoo Messenger uses up a lot of resources.

Again, thanks for your comments!
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#4
rddg

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Yahoo should uninstall from the add/remove programs selection in your control panel. With a memory upgrade, you should have no trouble running a reasonable amount of background services (chat, anti-virus/firewall, etc.)
However to note- Keep the old ram! more is better! Just put the new stick in the first slot,
and move the old one over. If your intent on removing it, just mail it to me! Heh.

My wife always said I know my RAM and plug-n-play. :whistling:

Edited by rddg, 05 July 2006 - 07:30 PM.

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#5
Samm

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Try crucials website for a price comparison (www.crucial.com).
Use their memory advisor to select or detect your system. Crucial will then give you a list of memory sticks which they guarantee to be compatible with your system. If it's cheaper than Dells, you can then order the memory online direct from Crucial.
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