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Installing new power supply


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#1
John Cutler

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Hi,

I am trying to upgrade my power supply from a 300w to a 500w.

I connect everything up and I do not get nay power to the motherboard.

Would it have anything to do with the motherboard?

I am putting in a Skyhawk Power One 0dBA~30dBA

My motherboard is Asus PTGD1 - LA

Help me please
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#2
digikiwi

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The obvious question is why are you replacing the PSU? Did the computer stop working or was it not performing well enough and you went for an upgrade?

If the former is the case it may be a dead motherboard.

If the latter is the case go back through the following (don't get annoyed if you've already tried it- sometimes overlooking the obvious wastes countless hours :blink: because you're sure you've done it - but actually haven't :whistling: )

Make sure the wall socket is working as well as any extension cables and multiplug packs - test with a desklamp or similar.

Make sure the power cable is firmly connected to PSU

Ensure the PSU switch is turned on.

Ensure all connectors are firmly and correctly! connected.

You could also try resetting the CMOS by removing the battery for 10 minutes and replacing it (or shorting the CMOS jumper if available).

Is the new PSU "new"? Can you test it in another computer to ensure it works?

Failing all these the motherboard increasingly looks like the culprit
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#3
Samm

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Assuming the system was working fine before the PSU upgrade & if you are getting NO power at all, then check the following things (please disconnect the external power lead first) :

Check that the 20pin ATX connector is connected correctly to the motherboard (i.e the right way round & fully inserted)

Check that the 4 pin square connector (ATX12V) is also correctly connected.

Check that the soft power connector is connected to the front panel header on the motherboard (this is the cable that connects the power switch on the front of the case to the motherboard). Check your motherboard manual to make sure it is connected to the correct pins.
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#4
John Cutler

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First of all I am updating my PSU as I got a video card which requires a minimum of 350w.

Check that the 20pin ATX connector is connected correctly to the motherboard (i.e the right way round & fully inserted)

Mine is 24 pin!!!!! Is this a problem?

Check that the 4 pin square connector (ATX12V) is also correctly connected.

Done

I have it on a power board should it be connected straight to the wall?

My motherboard is wirking fine, I have the old power supply on it now.
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#5
John Cutler

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This is the PSU I purchased

http://skyhawk.so-bu...g/img/gm-sc.pdf

Simple question, if I pluggd it into the wall and turned on the PSU (not connected to the mtoherboard or anything) shouldn't at least the fans go?
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#6
Neil Jones

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No because the PSU requires a load on it in order to start. Otherwise it would just burn itself out. Its this reason why you should never attempt to start the power supply when it isn't plugged into anything.

As for 24-pin, if your board only has 20 pins on it, four of the pins on one side of the connector will slide off. What you've probably done is got it four pins out so the contacts aren't being made properly.
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#7
John Cutler

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My board has 24 pins it is exactly the same as what I have now.

This is what is frustrating me
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#8
Neil Jones

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Return your power supply for a replacement as it looks like it is dead out of the box.

The motherboard doesn't care how much power it can have, as the power supply only gives it what it needs. It's very unlikely that you were using the full 300w PSU that HP have put in anyway, in fact quite a lot of systems in this regard are technically overpowered for the bits inside them but then again one needs the extra buffer.
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#9
Samm

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If you want to check whether the PSU is completely dead or not, try this....

**please follow these steps EXACTLY**
1. Disconnect the external power lead, then disconnect the 24pin ATX connector & the square 4 pin ATX12V connector from the motheboard.

2. Make sure you leave the power connected to the optical drives & hard drives.

3. Get a bare wire paperclip (or similar bit of wire). Straighten it out, then bend it into a U shape.

4. Reconnect the external power lead & switch the PSU on at the back. LEAVE THE 24PIN ATX & ATX12V DISCONNECTED.

5. Get hold of the 24pin ATX plug on the PSU, turn it upside down & insert one end of the paperclip into the hole which the green wire feeds to. Push it in far enough so it stays in place.
Next insert the other end of the paperclip into one of the neighbouring holes which has a black wire feeding into it.

6. This should start the PSU up (check to see if the PSU's fan is spinning). Turn the PSU off again by disconnecting the power lead or by using the power switch on the back of the PSU (if there is one).

If the PSU didn't power on at all, then it is completely dead.
If it DID power up, then either something else is the problem or the PSU isn't supplying enough power to start the motherboard. Let me know what happens if you do decide to test the psu this way
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