Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Computer isn't recognizing hard drive


  • Please log in to reply

#1
Anavette

Anavette

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
I hope I am posting this in the right area. If I am not please feel free to move it to the right area.
My mother in law had an awful amount of virus's and she decided that it would be best to put the system restore disks in and just dump the PC and start over. Well after the system went through the first disk it asked for the 2nd disk and when I put it in it gave me an error message that I can't remember what it said. So I restarted the PC with the 1st disk in it again and now all I keep getting is can't find hard drive and No emulation.

Is it possible for a virus to actually destroy the hard drive beyond repair?

Any help or suggestions on this problem would be greatly appreciated!!!

Thanks,
Ana
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Neil Jones

Neil Jones

    Member 5k

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,476 posts
Viruses can do a job known as "wiping sector 0" which basically means the computer will think that the hard drive isn't formatted. However this sort of activity has long been dropped in favour of sending your credit card details over the internet instead, plus it means the virus stays around a lot longer than it would if it wiped the drive :whistling:

There is no possibility in any way, shape or form that a virus can damage anything physically. There did use to be a virus called the "AntiCMOS " many years ago which basically allowed it to infect your computer even after you wiped the drive. Fortunately for most people it had a bug in it which meant it never did much damage, and was timed to do its deed in December of 1993. For this reason alone, the virus is virtually extinct.

As to your main issue, this may well be a physical problem with the drive itself and has just happened at the time you ran your recovery CD, which is often how Murphy's Law works. :blink:
  • 0

#3
Anavette

Anavette

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
So do you think I need to have the hard drive looked at? Or is there something I can do to fix it?

Thank you for responding.

Ana :whistling:
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP