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Windows XP Restarting


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#16
Doby

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Hi jjm006,

Ok good info, your cpu temp in bios 129f/54c is high because in bios your cpu is at idle so that is high for a idle temp and is one problem, but remember before you checked a cpu temp with Everast and it reported 100f / 38c that would be a very good temp so we need to decide witch is the correct temp before we fix something that may not need fixin.

I will explain more, 129f/54c cpu temp will not cause your problems by itself but that temp could rise to instable levels when playing games or other cpu intensive tasks.

I suspect a bad software read from Everast or a bad sensor read in bios

Try this unscientific test, let the computer off for 3 to 4 hours then make a note of the room temp, then go directly into bios and read the cpu temp do this as quickly as possible. Take note of the cpu temp and compare it to the room temp. In my experiments the cpu temp rises 3c to 5c from the time it takes from cold start to I get to bios and read the temp, anything else is just a error.

My point in your case is if you get a 3c to 5c differance or something close to that then bios temp is correct and you should clean and reapply themal paste to the heat sink (artic silver5 preferrable).

Also your 5v is right on the edge of spec I will look into that a little more and post back but we may also need to confirm this reading. If that reading is true the power supply would need to be replaced.

Rick
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#17
Doby

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Ok jjm006,

I looked into that 5v some more and here is what to check, with the computer running use a digital volt meter and on any power connector coming off the power suppllt (psu) touch one probe to the red wirer and one to the black.

If the reading is 5v then its ok but it could also read plus or minus 5% and still be within spec. The 4.75 your bios is reading is just within spec so if the volt meter confirms this I would replace the psu.

More detailed info Here

Please understand that troubleshooting hardware in this way is time consuming and sometimes it is easier to just replace parts till it works but that can be expensive so this is the alternative.

btw a digital volt meter is a inexpensive item that comes in handy around the house and garage.

Rick
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#18
jjm006

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Hey all - just wanted to give you an update.

After successfully running memtest, I discovered that there were over 40 back sectors on one stick of RAM. I played trial and error (wrong the first time) and my computer has run like a dream since then!

This PC had been looked at by 3 or 4 semi-professionals, who put computers together all day long, and they apparently never bothered to check the RAM...kind of sad, actually.

Thanks so much for the help!
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#19
gerryf

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good to know...sorry I didn't hop back in, but it looked like Doby was taking you through the process with his usual attention to detail and sage advice.


Wouldn't be too hard on the tech guys...memory is a funky thing. I've had systems test OK on memory with multiple tests but still go flakey on me until I pull a bad stick.

Still, reboots (not shut downs), are so often memory related, I am surprised they didn't settle on it after the videodrivers were update.

I wouldn't realy worry about the heat issue--it's warm as Doby noted, and maybe you want to keep an eye on it, but your processor will handle far more than that if you stay away from overclocking. It's worth noting that both BIOS and programs that monitor the censor are notorious for being unreliable...if you update your bios, you could see a 10 degree drop.

Edited by gerryf, 15 April 2005 - 06:50 AM.

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#20
Doby

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Great to here you got it fixed and thanks for leting us know how you did it.

I totally agree with gerryf don't worry about the temps if your computer is stable those censors could be messed up.

Rick
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#21
gerryf

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I've got a motherboard that reads a constant temp of 62 degrees celcius but a digitial thermometer reads 49 degrees C
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#22
Doby

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Yea I found that a digital thermometer is the only way to be sure just how far the censor is off and I always find they read high and more times then not in the range of 10c to 15c
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