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keeping laptop cool?


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#1
saraveza408

saraveza408

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These past few days it's been over 100 degrees where I live & my laptop has been getting hot fast.For a few days my dang XP wouldnt even work right with a fan next to it!
Im wondering what are the best tips you guys have for keeping your laptop cool during summer heat?
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#2
Pi rules

Pi rules

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There is one thing I've seen and heard good things about that has a few different names:
Notebook (laptop) cooling (chilling) pad
The name differs depending on the company that makes it, but they all use the same idea (edit: using fans to increase airflow and remove excess heat)

The main way to keep a notebook/laptop cool is to allow airflow (don't set it on your bed or couch). Try to keep it propped up so some air can get underneath if possible. Also, put it in hibernation or standby mode (or better yet shut it down) when it isn't in use. The lower power will generate less heat. Don't plug it in and let it charge for hours after it is charged if you aren't using it, because that can also generate more heat. Also, try not to expose it to direct sunlight for long periods of time.

Edited by Pi rules, 25 July 2006 - 06:58 AM.

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#3
lenr

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Well, I'm no expert, but I have dealt with some cooling issues on other electronic devices and I've taken apart a laptop. You might try putting the laptop up on little blocks so the air from the fan gets under it. Maybe fasten the blocks down and put little rubber pads or feet on top to keep it from sliding around. The laptop I took apart had an air intake on one side and an air exhaust on the other, with a tiny fan inside. I dont' know if this is usual.. If you can find a way to supply cooler air to the intake, that ought to help. If you've had this notebook for a while, it may be full of dust, which really hurts cooling. At a minimum, make sure the little grills on the air intake and exhaust are clean (if you have them). I'm not quite sure what the best way to clean the insides is, but a competent computer tech ought to know. If it was me I'd jump in with a screwdriver and a little brush or can of compressed air, but maybe I'd mess it up. I'd be much more willing to do this with a desktop. If you do go inside, make sure to take antistatic precautions grounding both you and the computer. And don't come back to me if you zap something inside.

Anyway, you ought to get some improvement just using the blocks. You could also try setting the computer on top of a thick metal plate, especially an aluminum one. The plate has to be larger than the notebook, and it ought to be pretty thick, too. Maybe a heavy aluminum serving tray? With a really large, thick plate, you probably won't need an additional cooling fan.

Oh, and make sure you haven't taped or otherwise attached anything to the outside of the laptop that covers very much of it.
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