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how to determine backup ups


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#1
jigga211

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Im shopping for a backup ups for my pc and im wondering how to determine how much watt I would need on one. I plan to have my pc connected along with a monitor, speakers, external hd and cable modem. Also not sure if it matters but i run a 700w psu in my pc.

right now im looking at Apc's 865W ups, can someone tell me if this will be enough?
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#2
austin_o

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You are on the right track, you know the total wattage of your computer power supply. Now look at the rest of the components you intend to power on the UPS. Each of them will have a label on it which tells you how many watts it will draw. All you need to do is add those values up. The result is how many watts the UPS will need to be able to provide.
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#3
Tru Techie

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wow, thats a lot. i wonder how expensive that UPS is gonna be.
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#4
jigga211

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its pretty cheap actaually only $200 Canadian.

But yea I dont understand when I add it up do i use the psu's full 700W in the addition? I mean i dont think Ill ever reach its full potential, maybe if i run crossfire it will get up to 600-650....

Also items like pc monitors and cable modems dont tell you the "watts" but instead they list volts and amps, the equation for Converting Amps to Watts goes like this

Watts = Amps x Volts

For example 1 amp * 110 volts = 110 watts

now take my monitor for exmaple it says: 100 - 240V ~ 2-1 Amps

so which ones do i multiply? the highest one's....? so 240 and 2 or what.

seems like way too much just for a monitor

Edited by jigga211, 04 August 2006 - 12:43 PM.

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#5
Tru Techie

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for the computer....you add up all the stuff in the case. for the monitor and modem and stuff, check their manuals. or specs of the products online.
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#6
Kemasa

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If you want an easy way to determine the power being used, there is a product called "kill-a-watt". A web search can find it, a review is at:

http://www.the-gadge..._monitor_review

You can often get a deal, if you know what you are doing, on ebay. The same is true for used a used UPS, but you have to assume that it may need new batteries and that can be expensive. Also, if you don't get a UPS which puts out a true sine wave, you can not have a surge suppressor connected to it as there will be issues. The true sine wave units are typically more expensive (such as the APC Smart UPS).

Another aspect to the UPS that you need to consider is how long you want the computer to be able to run before it shuts down. Unfortunately most of the lower end UPSs are based on power only. Some of the higher end units can have additional batteries attached to increase the time.
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