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Soldering Iron Question?


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#1
illuminated

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Greetings everyone! Quick Question. I need to Solder something on my laptop's Mobo. What type of Soldering Iron and Solderdo I need to do something as small as soldering a small connector to the power outlet on my board? Thanks all for your help.
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#2
warriorscot

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Just get a soldering kit most come with a big iron and a small detail one along with some plain lead free solder, soldering is pretty easy if you make a mistake you just melt the solder use the sooker and have another go i would learn how its not hard but there is a technique.

What exactly do you need to solder though you should never really have to solder anything and messing with the power outlet is a bit dangerous.
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#3
illuminated

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Thanks for the reply. I need to solder the power connector end on the back side of my laptops mobo. the actual bracket broke off and I need it to stay in place so I can plug my power adapter in and the pc will start. Is there a special type of Solder wire I need? I've seen 15watt soldering irons as standards, is that correct? Thanks.
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#4
warriorscot

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As far as i know, ive used 15 an 30W if i remember when i was taught how to use them, i think you also get a 5W for intricate work but i think those are specialised for jewelers more than electronics.

Normal lead free solder is what you need even though its lead free still do this in a ventialted area or youll get a headache like you wouldnt beleive.

Is the wire connections broken or is it just the bracket, if its the bracket thats loose and the wiring is intect i would reccomend a glue rather than solder as because solder conducts a mistake or a drip of solder in the wrong place could short something and that aint good.
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#5
illuminated

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thanks for the reply. its a plastic bracket that holds a little metal piece on it which needs to touch the connector on board so when i go plug my power adapter in it , it turns on. Ive tried super glue but that kinda stayed but not really?
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#6
dsenette

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Thanks for the reply. I need to solder the power connector end on the back side of my laptops mobo. the actual bracket broke off and I need it to stay in place so I can plug my power adapter in and the pc will start

did this part break off of the mobo or did the pin get pushed in? i had a simillar fix for a friend and instead of any kind of solder i used some epoxy putty (i think it's called magnum steel)...it's like silly putty...but it dries to about the same hardness as steel...plus it's stiff enough to be able to mold it around the connector and hold it in place long enough for the epoxy to set...plus it's not conductive so it shouldn't cause issues with the board or the connector
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#7
illuminated

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nice that putty stuff sounds good. the plastic piece broke off from the other half of the piece so if i put the two pieces together it stays on board. its just when i go to plug my power adapter into it, it falls off. this putty stuff is it a type of glue?
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#8
dsenette

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yeah....an extremely STRONG kind of glue...you can make nut's and bolts out of it if you really want to
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#9
warriorscot

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Its a putty some kind of thermo setting plastic, itll be based around a similar chemical reaction as glue but its a putty, glu should have worked but proper super glue takes a while to set and you need to get the right level of viscosity to get the job done alot of the time its not thick enough to hold that kind of thing in place while it sets, once it sets its stronger than steel.

The putty or a thicker faster drying super glue(i would go with an epoxy the kind you use for modelling rather than full on super glue). Epoxy is a wonderful thing for sticking stuff together in any form. Its ideal for electrincs because as dsenette mentioned its non conductive and you dont want things conducting where they shouldnt, also solder is quite brittle it doesnt sound like the best thing for the job.
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#10
Tru Techie

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epoxy putty? where can i get this? it sounds pretty cool, and i have never heard of it. also quick question while on the topic of soldering. my headphoens wires got screwed at some point in the chord (which i managed to pinpoint) whats the best way to fix this?
i have been told to use Heatshrink, but i dont see how it will be used as contact? does it act as a conductor?

Edited by Tru Techie, 11 August 2006 - 05:45 PM.

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#11
warriorscot

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Screwed? like tangled, if its not been broken you can try working it free if its broken i would just cut back the cable tie/twist them back into contect and then insulate with electrical tape as headphones arent worth the hassle and you usually dont solder things like cabling that you move about because like i said its brittle.

http://en.wikipedia....iki/Heat_shrink doesnt conduct you would use it the way i would use electrical tape, its basically super electrical tape.
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#12
Tru Techie

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oh ok, thanx alot scot. so i just cut the cable, and use electric tape after i twist them together, thanx man.
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#13
warriorscot

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Well thats what i would do, theres probably a better way of doing it but thats the best way i can think of mind you unless the headphones were particularly good or expensive i dont bother fixing them and if they are any good they will have a warranty, otherwise i just get a new pair.
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#14
Tru Techie

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well that didnt go so well..........thats wonderful........i need new headphones now..........darn....
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#15
warriorscot

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Lol, Headphones are tricky the wires are quite thin which is the reason i buy new ones when they break, if youre careful have some god pliers and clips you can usually salvage them(if its got the really really thin copper braid style wires you might need a magnifying glass).
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