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Secondary hard drive is invisible to computer


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#1
roguejafo

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Hello. First-time caller... I recently tried to turn on the 'puter and nothing happened. After some checking and asking, I replaced the power supply. Since then, booting was a problem, which mysteriously went away. But the lingering problem is that my secondary hard drive, which was added maybe six months ago as an archive, is no longer recognized by the system; it doesn't appear in My Computer, or Device Manager. It is plugged in, and I tried swapping cables with the main hd with no change. My current hypothesis is that the hd was damaged when the power supply croaked, (whichever went first seems irrelevant to me), but I don't know how to determine if it's really dead. I mean, the system doesn't seem to notice it at all; is that enough to say it's dead? (Duh...) Should I try putting it into another machine to see if that one sees it? Maybe I'm in denial about the obvious...

CD and DVD drives seem to be working ok.

Any advice would be appreciated.
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#2
Samm

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Welcome to G2G

Is the second drive on the same ribbon cable as the first hard drive, with the two optical drives sharing the other ribbon cable?
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#3
roguejafo

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hello

Yes, both hard drives share a ribbon cable, and both optical drives share the other. I tried switching the connectors between the two hard drives, both ribbon and power, with no change. I did not try switching the ribbons between the hard drives and the opticals; perhaps I will.

I did try putting the hard drive in another computer, and that one didn't see it either. But I suppose that could be related to jumpers, which I didn't even look at, or the great and mysterious (to me, anyway) BIOS, whatever that's all about.
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#4
Samm

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Jumpers would be the first thing to check.
Can you tell me the manufacturers name & model number of the BOTH the hard drives please. (This will be written on the label on the top of each drive)

That way I can tell you exactly how each drive should be configured
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#5
roguejafo

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The questionable (likely dead) hd is a Maxtor MaXLine Plus II 250GB ATA/133 HDD, doesn't have an actual model number on the label, but there is a picture showing the jumper configurations: No Jumper = DS(SLAVE). There is no jumper. So far so good...(it worked this way before)...(in my machine)...

The good hd in the good machine (which also did not see the questionable hd) is a Maxtor model 5T040H4. It doesn't have a picture of the jumpers, but a label says: Jumper: J50 ; Master/Single: ON ; Slave: OFF . There is a jumper; it's on the second pair of pins from the 50-end, (vs the 42-end). (Does that make it pins 48 & 49?) (Does this make sense?) Hope it helps.
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#6
Samm

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From what you've described, it sounds like the good drive is jumpered as CS (cable select). This may be causing a problem for the second drive.
I suggest you try 2 different configurations & see if either work :

1) Jumper the slave drive as CS as well

2) If this doesn't help, then set the jumper on the good drive to Master, covering the pair of pins labelled J50 (i.e the first pair at the J50 end, as opposed to the second pair)
Jumper the second drive as a Slave again.

Also remember that the slave drive must be connected to the middle connector on the IDE ribbon cable, and the first (good) drive on the end of the cable.

If you still can't get the bios to detect the drive, then place your hand on the top of the drive whilst the system is powered on - you should feel it spin up after you first power the system on.

If it does spin up, then another thing to try is connecting this drive to the ribbon cable on it's own. i.e remove the good drive & place the dodgy one on the end connector.

Let me know what happens
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#7
roguejafo

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I jumpered the slave drive as CS, made sure it was on the middle connector; the machine wouldn't boot up. I restarted and a screen appeared saying windows failed to start. I selected "start windows normally", the screen went blank and stayed that way. I powered down.

I set the good drive to Master, set the slave to Slave again, made sure the slave drive was on the middle connector on the ribbon and powered up. I got the same screen: windows failed to start. I selected "start windows normally" and this time I got a boot screen, but then that froze; the progress bar was just empty... It never booted up.

Each time I powered up I placed my hand on the questionable drive; I felt only very faint vibration, which I suppose could have traveled through the cables; it didn't vibrate anywhere nearly as much as the good hard drive, which I could feel "humming"; in comparison, the dodgy one just felt still.

I didn't try it by itself, didn't see the point since it doesn't seem to be powering up, and I don't know if there's a boot disk for the floppy around...

So can this thing be pronounced dead? Its under warranty, but the data on it...
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#8
Samm

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OK, you said Windows failed to boot in any of these configurations, but was the drive detected by the bios at all?
Have you tried removing the good drive & just having the dodgy drive on the end of the cable on its own, jumpered as a master? Does the bios detect it then?

If you try all these things & the bios still detect the drive at all, then it does sound like the drive may dead. If it's under warranty then obviously you can return it. Be prepared to lose all the data on the drive though.
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#9
roguejafo

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I just tried it again, by itself on the end if the cable, got a DOS screen saying invalid boot drive, prompting for a floppy boot disk, which I tried but had no effect. The drive didn't seem to spin up at all. I don't know if there's something special I need to do to determine whether the BIOS detected it, I couldn't get beyond the prompt for a boot disk.

The hard drive is under warranty, and I already have the new one. (They sent it in advance; cool, I didn't know that could happen...) Anyway, I put it in my computer configued exactly as the old one was and it was detected right away. It's not in my computer, but it's in device manager, and when I clicked it I was prompted to initialize it. So, if a new one works and the old one doesn't, well I guess that wraps it up, eh?

If you have any more suggestions, great. If not, thanks for your help.
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#10
Samm

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You need to actually go into bios setup in order to determine whether the drive is being detected or not.
Power the system on (with just the dodgy drive connected as before). As soon as the LED on the monitor turns from amber to green, you need to press the relevant key to enter the bios - on most systems this is the DEL key. Press it a few times in quick succession.
NB. If you have a branded system such as HP, Dell etc, then it may be a different key (e.g F1 or F2).

Once in the bios, you should find the drives listed opn the first or main bios page. If you can see a HDD auto-detect utility, then run it.

Let me know if the drive is found by the bios
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#11
DHS-Trump-1

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Hey, name's Joe. Anyway, I've read the whole thread, but I'm still having problems. I have my girl's hard drive slaved to mine to clear it and hopefully give her a new OS.
She has a computer, like many, that need a disk to reformat (mine uses a partition). Her disk was scratched when she tried to reformat, and now has no OS at all.
So, I had her send it to me. I have it, as I'm writing this, slaved to my machine. My good HDD, a Western Digital WD2000, is set to Cable Select and is on the correct IDE connector. Hers, a Samsung SV1021H/GTS is on the Slave connector set to Cable Select, as well. Hers has two jump clips, as opposed to my one. Both of our HDDs have pictures denoting where to place the clips for the desired settings. Hers has settings for a "32GB Clip." I have no idea what that means, but I'm not using those settings.
My Hardware Manager shows the drive, so it's not completely invisible. It says "Uninitialized" and has no volumes listed. I have no idea what to do. Is it possible to call her manufacturer, give them the HDD serial number, and get a replacement disk sent to me? Her machine was running Windows ME.
Lemme know what you can. Thanks.

-Joe

Edited by DHS-Trump-1, 06 September 2006 - 07:52 PM.

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