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Dumping your PC


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#1
Gooseman

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I bought my computer about 3 years ago and after my kids & i surfed the web we have alot of unneccesary files. I don't know which ones to delete and what ones to save. So figured i would just reboot to day 1 & start all over again. Our computer seems to be booting up slower and shutting down slower, so i just want to empty my PC and start fresh. What do i need to know about dumping my PC and how to do it. Thanx!
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#2
Jack Doobie

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you`ll need your Windows XP cd to Format your computer
dont ask me how to...when i did it for mine, it took me about 3 days, because my copmuter was so screwed up,

im sure someone else will reply with an anwser
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#3
Slayerzer0

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Yeh as he said u gotta have ur windows XP disk, but first of all, boot ur computer, and press whatever key it says to run setup, or enter the bios.
Within the bios u need to set your first boot device to CDROM - so ur computer boots from a cd first (this setting is in different places for different bios's but shudnt be hard to find)
once youve done this, put the XP cd in and reboot ur pc
now when u reboot it will say press any key to boot from disk, press a key and you will be in the windows setup page - let it load everything and then press enter, delete the partition u have on ur hard drive (follow instructions on screen) and then press C to create a new partition and press enter, then follow the instructions to Format that partition, this will take time, once thats done it will restart and install windows, and thats it ur done
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#4
magusbuckley

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Hello and welcome to the board!

As you become more computer literate, you'll learn how to take care of programs that eat up your memory.

From what I read, "True" computer geeks reinstall their operating system every 6 months or so to keep the system clean. Instead, I try to keep myself informed about what programs are running on my machine, why they are running, and when they are running.

This all comes with time buddy.

Enough about me, let me answer your question so you can get going.

First, I'd say that before "dumping" (as you call it) your system, you may be interested in upgrading your memory - especially if you baught this computer used. You can find out what type of memory you need, and how much memory your computer will hold, by looking up your system at the manufacturer's web site. There, you will find information about what your system's motherboard will and will not run.

If you aren't interested in this and want to do that dump you were talking about...do this.

First, make sure you have a copy of your Operating System (Windows) and the CD-Key. The CD-Key can be found on the jacket holding your CD, on the case of the PC itself, or stuck to some documentation included with your PC. It really depends on when the system was made and who the manufacturer is.
Now you need to make sure you have drivers for the hardware you use. Drivers are like instructions to the computer. When you connect a printer to the back of your PC, Windows detects there is a new printer to be installed. What it doesn't know, is how the printer works. You see, there are so many different types of printers - inkjet, bubblejet, laser, multifunction, and so on and so on and so forth - and they all work differently. The driver tells your computer exactly what type printer you have and how it operates. Most of today's hardware items are plug and play; meaning Windows will automatically install the drivers for the harware. To be on the safe side, however, make sure you find your driver disks. If, after starting your PC from scratch, you have problems with any hardware and can't find a driver disk, just download the latest driver from the web at the manufacturer's website.

OK, you know your prloblem, and now you have your tools. The next step is to back up your documents. Backup all of your important and/or favorite documents to the media accessible to you - CD Burner, DVD Burner, Zip Drive, Tape Drive, etc.

Now.......Hmmmm, I hate to put a hold on right now, but we can't go any further until I know what Operating System you are trying to reinstall. I also need to know if it is the "Upgrade" version or the "Full" version". Let me know and we'll get back on this.

If you think you can go on without me, try this....you'll need to boot the computer with the OS in the CD ROM Drive. Press a key to boot from CD. Use the options to delete and then create a partition. Format the drive and reinstall the operating system. When the system comes up, install drivers for any non plug and play devices you may have. Then restore your backed up data.

Hope this helps for now.
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#5
Gooseman

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hey thanx for the help ... i really appreciate your feedback! i bought my pc new from dell ... it came with windows ME ... dell sent me an XP home edition upgrade ... so what one do i install first ... ME or go right to XP?
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#6
gerryf

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Hello and welcome to the board!

...From what I read, "True" computer geeks reinstall their operating system every 6 months or so to keep the system clean.  ...

View Post


That is less true today than it was in the pre-windowsNT days.

Then, windows did a horrible job cleaning up after itself and running. Deleting programs left hundreds of settings and files on your computers that Windows was not smart enough to ignore. Installing programs would install old versions of files over newer ones. Cats and dogs living in sin....WindoesME/98/95 really did slow down regardless of how well you knew your machine or kept it well maintained.

Well...Uninstall routines are much cleaner today, Windows doesn't load DLLs and fonts just because it can, and a system need never be reinstalled if problems are never encountered.

People who install and uninstall a lot of programs, hardware or do heavy work, however, might still do a reinstall every once in a while, but a typical user need not worry.

And Gooseman, I didn't quite understand your question in the other thread, but I believe I answered it anyway. You don't need...and do not want, to use your Windows ME disk other than to use it as proof that you qualify for the upgrade.

Installing WinME first, and then upgrading has several drawbacks, most notably a performance hit when you convert fat32 file system to ntfs.
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