Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

regular router vs VPN router


  • Please log in to reply

#1
jmoney3457

jmoney3457

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts
hey all i just have 1 quick simple question, ok so my dad connects to his companies server from our home via VPN (virtual private network) and every so often *once or twice every 2 weeks* he'll be unable to connect to his companies VPN and i was told that routers aren't good for connecting to an VPN and that I should connect his laptop straight into the cable modem but this is a no can do because we're running other machines off the router so if i do that the internet to the other machines will obviously be cut off, that being said we currently have a 4 port Linksys BEFSR41 router and my question is would it make much of a difference/be worth it to upgrade to a more expensive high end router thats specifically made for VPN (routers made especially for VPN) or is this router just fine?because i dont want to make the upgrade to a much more expensive router made for VPN unless it would make a BIG difference in his few times a month connection issues to his companies VPN thanks for any and all input :whistling:

Edited by jmoney3457, 13 September 2006 - 12:59 PM.

  • 0

Advertisements


#2
dsenette

dsenette

    Je suis Napoléon!

  • Administrator
  • 26,019 posts
  • MVP
vpn's are generally more affected by the router that's hosting them and the connecting client...alot less by the router you're connecting from...

how does he connect to the vpn? does he have a specific software client or does he just use the windows vpn jazz?
  • 0

#3
jmoney3457

jmoney3457

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts

vpn's are generally more affected by the router that's hosting them and the connecting client...alot less by the router you're connecting from...

how does he connect to the vpn? does he have a specific software client or does he just use the windows vpn jazz?

thanks for your reply dsenette I think he uses software called "conectivity VPN"..so your basically saying its usually more likely his companies VPN router and there client rather than our router?

Edited by jmoney3457, 13 September 2006 - 03:08 PM.

  • 0

#4
dsenette

dsenette

    Je suis Napoléon!

  • Administrator
  • 26,019 posts
  • MVP
if it were consistant i'd say it might be something on your end...but since it's every once and a while...it just..seems to suggest that it's more of an issue outside of your house
  • 0

#5
jmoney3457

jmoney3457

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts
oh ok but in the long run would upgrading to a high end VPN router make much difference or is it not worth it?
  • 0

#6
jmoney3457

jmoney3457

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts
any thoughts? :whistling:
  • 0

#7
dsenette

dsenette

    Je suis Napoléon!

  • Administrator
  • 26,019 posts
  • MVP
i can't say one way or another if it will help your situation...but here's the difference between the classes of routers you're talking about...

the vpn specific routers are designed to facilitate you allowing a vpn IN to your network...they don't really have a methodology for facilitating a VPN OUT of your network (to my knowledge)...the client side of the vpn is controlled by the client (usually the client software)..

you may notice a bit better performance from an upgrade but i would suspect that this performance would be better attributed to the quality of the router...not it's vpn status
  • 0

#8
jmoney3457

jmoney3457

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 161 posts

i can't say one way or another if it will help your situation...but here's the difference between the classes of routers you're talking about...

the vpn specific routers are designed to facilitate you allowing a vpn IN to your network...they don't really have a methodology for facilitating a VPN OUT of your network (to my knowledge)...the client side of the vpn is controlled by the client (usually the client software)..

you may notice a bit better performance from an upgrade but i would suspect that this performance would be better attributed to the quality of the router...not it's vpn status

oh ok so basically a VPN router would be more for if we have a VPN network coming INTO our house rather than going out to someone elses (his companies) VPN
  • 0

#9
dsenette

dsenette

    Je suis Napoléon!

  • Administrator
  • 26,019 posts
  • MVP
right....the VPN stuff on your router would be for setting up a VPN connection at YOUR location...not for maintaining quality of a VPN connection FROM your location....

some of the newer fancier routers do have options for QOS (Quality Of Service) which COULD allow you to give network preference to VPN traffic...if you know how to set up QOS that is....so that all VPN traffic gets priority over anything else on the pipe (music dl's, surfing, email, etc...)...but this doesn't guarantee success
  • 0

#10
dsenette

dsenette

    Je suis Napoléon!

  • Administrator
  • 26,019 posts
  • MVP
i just had a thought for a way to test some of this...IN THEORY you might be able to get a cheap hub and change your network topology just a little...to look like this

from the wall to the modem, from the modem to the hub, from the hub to the router and also from the hub to your dad's comptuer with the vpn stuff...

i'm not sure if this would work but it might allow your dad to connect through the modem instead of the router without losing connectivity to the rest of the house...

i can see a few reasons for this not to work...but you can get a cheap hub for 40 bucks or less..and if it doesn't work you could return it
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP