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Where should I install my programs?....


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#1
magusbuckley

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Hello:

I have a singe 80 GB HD for Windows XP Home. I have two 160GB HDs in a RAID 0 Stack for speed. I'm about to format my system to give it an overhaul. When I get ready to reinstall my programs, where should I install them to get the best performance? On the Windows Drive or the RAID stack.

I assume the raid stack, but I'm thinking that may not be the case since I'm pulling my data from that drive at the same time.

Any and all information will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

Magus
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#2
SRX660

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Even if i partition a single drive into 2 partitions all programs are installed on the "C" drive along with the OS. All data is put on the 2nd partition. That way if you need to wipe the "C' drive and reinstall windows you do not lose your data. Of course important data is backed up to cd or dvd also.

Every computer i build i make a 20 gig "C" drive and the rest of the drive for a data "D" drive. I still do this even when running multiple hard drives. I personally don't think a raid array is necessary for a home computer. I would rather just build another computer with a single drive. I might have a raid array if i wanted a web server or such but its just overkill for a home computer.

SRX660
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#3
magusbuckley

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SRX:

I suppose you answered my question with your first statement. I know what you mean when you say "if you need to wipe the "C" drive and reinstall windows you do not lose your data". Thats why I have my data on the RAID stack and my OS on the 80 Gig stand alone drive. My data gets backed up weekly to an external drive. Once a month, I burn an updated backup to DVD's and put them in a fireproof safe.

In your next paragraph, you say you make a 20 Gig "C" drive and the rest for data but that isn't always possible. I have my OS and programs installed to "C" right now and have used a little over 30 Gigs of my 80 Gig HD. I understand you don't think a RAID array is necessary for a home computer, but I suppose you don't know what I do with my home computer.

Two years ago, I created a web page for friends and family to see my little girl since they all live far away from us. I update that site regularly. In addition, I do video editing and play video games. My wife and I both love our Digital Rebel XT, so we take a lot of photos and do a lot of photo editing as well.

I guess my point is this....people build computers to fit their needs. If a 20 Gig HD for "C" works for you fine, but not everyone can run on a 20 Gig drive buddy.

I started using a RAID stack when I built this computer a year and a half ago. It may be overkill to you, but I'm loving it.

I hope that didn't sound harsh. It's just that you sound a lot like a friend I use to have. When we use to talk computers, he would get angry if I talked about ordering a HP Burner or a Seagate HD etc. because he things you have to have specific parts and set things up his way only. If I didn't get a Sony Burner or a Maxtor HD it was wrong. If I didn't set up my system his way, it was wrong. He hated my backup routine. He thinks its stupid for me to have my wide screen monitor turned vertically. WHO CARES? It's mine and I'll do with it as I please. I wanted a HP burner because I wanted to check out the litescribe feature. I got a Seagate drive because I've never had any problems with one in the past. I have my monitor turned Vertically so I don't have to scroll so much when I type documents or look at web pages. When I edit movies and photos, I have more room for toolbars but can still see the whole photo just fine.

Please don't turn into my friend and think it has to be your way or nothing at all. I'm not friends with that guy any more. We just never saw eye to eye.

Well, thank you for the information. I'll keep it all in mind when I blow my system away during my days off (Tuesday and Wednesday).

Thanks,

Magus
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#4
b1caez01

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I feel your "pain," but we are all here to make general suggestions, to not only you, but to those who maybe reading your posts to get their own help, and they are too shy to ask. I know that I harp on reformatting, just as an example, and I get reminded that there are better ways...but like you, I have, over time, found, that 9 times out of 10, that is end result, so why not get it over with and move on.

It seems like yesterday when I was fighting with DOS, and Windows 3.1. 3.1 totally floored me...and here we are on the verge of VISTA! ...with out blinking an eye. The issue is, in my humble opinion, that MS rushes its products to market with out fully testing them and altering the designs in the software...WE are left to pick up the pieces...as noted in the long delay to VISTA, which is still in the tank. Much beta testing is still going on, with millions of tweaks.

Don't panic, go easy on yourself...

One wee suggestion, if you have to reinstall Windows to the first partition, do not reformat the hard drive...just do a simple reinstall cum-repair. You may lose everything on the whole drive otherwise. Use the Windows, built in partitioning agent, not a 3rd party program. I used Partition Magic, and lost everything...no loss, as I had everything on Disks, but it was the principle of the matter. I was advised by a geek to only use Windows Partioning agent... I have not had to test this hypothesis out yet.

Edited by b1caez01, 16 September 2006 - 10:09 PM.

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#5
SRX660

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Magus, i was not suggesting you do exactly as i do. It was just a suggestion on a method of partitioning. I have a unique situation that i have 5 computers i run for different purposes. One computer is only for the internet an has no other software on it than what is needed for the internet. Another is a graphics and video computer. A third is just for html and on-line business software. A forth is for games, and a fifth as a software test computer. Each has different software on them and it suits me to have it this way.

I have no way to know what you do with your computer. I do understand you have a method to what you do. I only wish you could see the condition of some of the computers that people bring to me and say " It's runs slow, or funny, can you fix it". I can only give to people what knowledge i have learned. I am sorry if you feel i have offended you. That was not my intent.

SRX660
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#6
Johanna

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I always install my programs on the C drive with XP because if I trash XP, I'm going to have to reinstall all of the programs anyway. I do run (and print) a Belarc occasionally in case I do want to duplicate what i had before i killed the OS.
http://www.belarc.co...e_download.html
The original question was:
When I get ready to reinstall my programs, where should I install them to get the best performance? On the Windows Drive or the RAID stack.
My opinion is the Windows OS partition. I used to run Office from another partition, and noticed that it had hooks all over C, so it was spending time "searching" for what it needed, because what it needed was not always in the expected place. That slows down performance.
Just my two cents.
Johanna
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#7
magusbuckley

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Johanna:

Thanks for the information. Sounds like you hit the nail on the head. You've given me not one, but two reasons to install the programs on the C: drive. First, I'd have to reinstall the programs if my C: drive crashed anyway. Second, even if I install the programs elsewhere, they will still put some necessary files and folders in the C: drive.

I really appreciate your answer.

SRX660: I'm sorry, but it seems I have offended you and not the other way around. I gave you all just enough information to answer my question with my initial post, but since got off on the subject of PC Setup...here's how my drives are really laid out. I have an 80 Gig HD with two partitions. One Partition runs XP Home (my main OS). The other partition runs XP Pro x64 edition (not enough compatable software to use as my main OS). I have a second physicall drive, a 40 Gig HD I pulled from an old machine, that runs VISTA (Just playing with this OS so I'll have a feel for it when it's released). And finally, I have my two SATA 160 Gig HDs set in a RAID 0 stack for storing my data.

I appreciate everyones help.

Thanks,

Magus
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#8
Johanna

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Magus,
I like the way you have your system set up! You can play with the 64 bit and Vista w/o bothering your main work OS. Also, you have a functional back up routine in place, so if one of the drives blows up, or there is some other calamity, you haven't lost anything, and your data is safe. Good planning means less headaches. ;-)
Johanna
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#9
b1caez01

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The long and short of it is, that you put your OS and all actively running progs related to that particular OS, such as OFFICE, on the same drive as that OS...one drive, in one easily accessible place.

It has been my experience that partitions are for running another OS's and the programs associatated with them... OR as caches, where data will be relatively safe...unless you do something stupid :whistling: like I did and used what I thought was safe, a 3rd party partitioner.

I believe, partitions are to be considered as non-primary-OS caches therefore...thus the "hooks."

...but what do I know :blink:
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