Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Hot CPU?


  • Please log in to reply

#1
Ste

Ste

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
Hello, I have just noticed on a piece of software called 'Corecentre' (MSI) that the CPU temperature was 170F. I am used to seeing from around 50F-75F and have always wondered if that was hot. Can anyone adise on this. I have just shut down for 15mins and rebooted, it now reads 127F. Do I need to take action or is this acceptable.

Steve
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
170F is way too high and you should cross check this value with another software. You can either chick in the BIOS (look at "computer health", "hardware monitor" or something of this nature) or download Everest home edition from here . Run the software, enter Computer > Sensor, wait few seconds and you will see cpu, board and HD temps. Temps shoulf nor exceed 130F, even under continuous heavy load..
  • 0

#3
Ste

Ste

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
Hi, thanks for the reply. I have done as you suggested regarding Everest home edition and I have a reading of 113F at the moment, mainboard 95F. Should I take steps to avoid damaging the cpu as temp does seem to be fluctuating and may go up again?

Steve
  • 0

#4
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
113F is fine for normal load and you shouldn't worry. Temps always fluctuate due to different loads on the cpu and slight voltage changes. If you want to test temps under heavy load that's very simple. Run Everest and minimize it. Run a full scan with your antivirus. During the scan expand Everest once in a while to check temps.
  • 0

#5
Ste

Ste

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
Hi, I still seem to have a problem as the temperature has increased again. According to the 'Core centre' software the temperature is 158F on checking the BIOS PC health as you suggested it reads 150F and the Everest home edition sensor reading is now 133F all checked within a few minutes and only fluctuating 2-3 degrees. Since yesterday I have swapped the heatsink and fan from another system I have as this alternative has a thermal blanket but this doesn't seem to have helped much. I would be interested to know what the cause might be and how I can lighten the load if that would help. Are there BIOS settings that could be changed to help the situation? The CPU is Intel Pentium 4, 3200 MHz (16 x 200) Multi processor - if that helps.

Steve
  • 0

#6
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
All temp readings are too high.

1: I assume your cpmputer is not overclocked. If it is, it could easily cause overheating.
2: It is possible that the temp sensor on the motherboard is inaccurate. It happens quite often and there is not much that you can do about. As a rule of thumb, if the base of the heatsink is hot to point of burning your fingers then the temerature is high enough to damage the cpu over time. Let's assume that this is not the case.
3: Check voltages with Everest. Voltages should not acceed 5% of the recommended value.

check the following (1-3 are a routine that should be performed with every computer that enters a lab):

1: Make sure that all fans are spinning freely and vents in the box and power supply unit are clean of dust.
2: make sure that air circulation is correct. The fan on the cpu must blow air into the heatsink. A rear mounted fan must draw air from within the box and push it outside. A front, bottom, mounted fan must draw air from the outside and push it into the box.
3: The heatsink must be clean of dust.
4: Remove the heatsink and clean it's bottom perfectly from any remains of thermal pad or paste. If it is a thermal pad make sure to remove the aluminium foil that stick to the bottom.
5: Clean the top of the cpu. The surfaces must be perfectly clean.
6: Get a good quality thermal paste and smear a very thin layer on top of the cpu and contact area at the bottom of the heatsink.
7: reinstall the heatsink. Do it carefully, making sure that there is a perfect contact between the surfaces. If, for some reason you didn't succeed, smear the paste again.


If all this does'nt help then remove the side cover of the computer and let it run without the cover. If temps drop down to desired levels then it indicates that your computer is underventilated and you should consider adding another fan or getting a high quality heatsink and exhaust fan.
  • 0

#7
Knight_Wolf

Knight_Wolf

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 58 posts
well an air conditioned room reduces the temp a lot....n if ur so worried abt the temp i suggest u get a new cooling fan installed bigger n more more powerful suiting ur needs
  • 0

#8
Ste

Ste

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
Thanks for the trouble you have taken to reply. You assume correctly that the system is not overclocked but I am not sure about the sensor problem as I have just noticed on the 'Corecentre' software that is on both my systems that the fan speeds are drastically different. On my main computer, (the one with the problem) the speed is only around 170-80rpm and the fan speed alert is flashing. The other system shows 3515rpm. It might be presumed that there is a problem with the heatsink fan from this but as I mentioned I have swapped over the heatsinks and fans, the one which was originally on the problem system now having the faster fan speed, the CPU running at around 55F(both systems have the same mainboard). I can only think because of this that a change has occurred affecting the fan speed (used to run at 50-75F) but not the fan itself. Does this sound logical? If so have I got a problem mainboard or is there another possibility.
Sorry this is dragging on but as you know another processor could work out expensive and the problem would probably still exist though I have read that the system will cut out due to accesive overheating- it hasn't done that yet. (Everest temp now at 132F)

Steve
:whistling:
  • 0

#9
The Skeptic

The Skeptic

    Trusted Tech

  • Technician
  • 4,075 posts
170-180 rpm is impossibly slow under any circumstances. As you may know cpu fan speed is variable in most computer. I have never seen cases in which fan speed went down below around 800 rpm.

I would suggest that you re-swap the fans and check the slow one on the other computer. If it revs up to logical speed then your problem is with the motherboard. If it doesn't rev up then the problem is most likely with the fan itself and it should be replaceed.

If you find out that the problem is with the motherboard you can cut the connecor from the fan (leave as long wire as possible) and solder it to a 12 volt pair of wires that go from the power supply unit to your storage devices. This will run the fan at full speed all the time but will save motherboard replacement.
  • 0

#10
Ste

Ste

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 143 posts
Well, I was considering re-swapping the fans last night when the system re-started twice in a row. I noticed it was when I was checking the temp on both the 'Corecentre' software and the 'Everest' program at the same time, I don't know why! However after rebooting again and presuming I was in trouble with overheating I noticed that the fan speed was back to normal 3068rpm and the temp was 50C - 122F (sorry I had been getting mixed up with F&C before regarding normal temp).
So, what can I say, only that I will be keeping my fingures crossed. For the record I hadn't moved the box so I don't know what to think, just hope it doesn't come back to haunt me. Thanks again for the advice which I will keep in mind.

Steve :whistling:
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP