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Getting a personal computer in summer..


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#1
Matt L

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I'm getting a personal computer around summer, and I don't know much about computers. I was wondering if some of you could probably help me and give me some advice on what computer I should get or what specifications I need to build in on a custom one.

Now I don't want it to be too expensive. I'd also like to notify you guys that are helping me that I'll also be needing my own monitor, mouse, keyboard, etc. So please include a full-computer set.

I'll probably play some games on it, so I'm going to need a decent graphics card, but the thing that I will probably be doing the most with the computer is browsing the web and maybe experimenting with some programming and graphic designing.

Oh and a decent hard drive. (100GB?)

Thanks.

Edited by Matt L., 30 September 2006 - 04:25 PM.

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#2
Facedown98

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What kind of games will you be playing? Some are more demanding than others. Also, do you have speakers, or no? (Most manufacturers consider that an accessory, but mice and keyboards are standard)
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#3
Matt L

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I will also be needing speakers.

And I will mostly be playing Halo, Maple Story, and maybe Guild Wars or BattleField2, but if the price of the computer gets too expensive, then I might as well exclude the gaming because gaming isn't a big necessity of my computer because I can just customize it in the future when I really need to.

Edited by Matt L., 30 September 2006 - 07:36 PM.

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#4
james_8970

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Any real advice that we'd hand out to you right now would be very useless by the time you buy. What is one the shelves now, won't be in the future. Compitition is ever increasing (hoping Intel will start realising thier own GPU's to furthur lower prices) and computers are becoming more and more afordable.
While i personally believe that anyone telling you exactly what parts to buy right now would be a waste of thier time, but suggesting you to begin reasearching EVERYTHING regarding computers and thier hardware would not. I'm buying/building my computer in the end of Febuary 2007 (after some of the bugs are worked out of vista) and have been learning as much as possible about computer since march i'd say. While we can suggest what to buy you are still going to need to know how to build it. I'd suggest to begin buying magazines, looking on the web since its more up to the minute and buying books. There is where the real knowledge is, and remember, this forum is for advice, if you don't know what your getting yourself into, you might accept inncorrect advice. Beware.
Then 1 month before you start your build, i'd ask them same question.......
Just my 2 cents.
James

Edit: by that time your probably going to want battlefield 2142

Edited by james_8970, 30 September 2006 - 09:25 PM.

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#5
Facedown98

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Very true. Also, if there's anything you want on that laptop, do it when you order. It's risky to be making modifications such as video card switches, etc. not to mention that it will cost you.
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#6
Matt L

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Aren't Dells horrible?
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#7
Facedown98

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For laptops, yes. I suggest Toshiba, Sony, or IBM.
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#8
james_8970

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I wouldn't suggest sony at the time being, there has been HUGE batery recalls over the past month.
But wasn't this originaly about a computer not a laptop.
James

Edited by james_8970, 01 October 2006 - 05:20 PM.

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#9
Facedown98

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I'm sure they'll be fine by summer 2007 :whistling:
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#10
james_8970

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lets hope, but where it stands, I wouldn't be recomending Sony laptops to anyone anytime. Nor any company using thier battery's, such as imacs.....i hate imac's :whistling:
James
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#11
warriorscot

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Its not really sonys fault and its not just their batteries getting recalled, lithium ion batteries are inherantly dangerous theres not a manufacturer yet who can stand up and say they wont catch fire or explode under some conditions, and if you drop them from any height they all explode. Its just the nature of the batteries themselves its the reason for the last few years companies have been investing billions in research of alternatives to lithium ion batteries because well they kinda suck but they are the only practical choice at the moment.

What sony did and others was push that technology to far the more powerful the battery the more chance of fire and explosion you pack that much energy in a little box its not gonna react well all of the time.
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#12
james_8970

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Ya i understand that, forgot to add it to my post. But Sony does seem to be having troubles at the moment, 6.5 million batteries being recalled is no small number. Besies its not only the batteries, Sony computer systems are over priced, e.g. Vaio, or they seem to be so to me.

Did you catch the recommendations from the CPSC :whistling: i think they are a little obvious. Got this from Toms hardware.

Here is the complete list of CPSC tips.

1. Computer batteries can get hot during normal use. Do not use your computer on your lap.

2. Do not use your computer on soft surfaces, such as a sofa, bed or carpet, because it can restrict airflow and cause overheating.

3. Do not permit a loose battery to come in contact with metal objects, such as coins, keys or jewelry.

4. Do not crush, puncture or put a high degree of pressure on the battery as this can cause an internal short-circuit, resulting in overheating.

5. Avoid dropping or bumping the computer. Dropping it, especially on a hard surface, can potentially cause damage to the computer and battery. If you suspect damage contact the manufacturer.

6. Do not place the computer in areas that may get very hot.

7. Do not get your computer or battery wet. Even though they will dry and appear to operate normally, the circuitry could slowly corrode and pose a safety hazard.

8. Follow battery usage, storage and charging guidelines found in the user's guide.

Would have never guessed some of these :blink:
James

Edited by james_8970, 01 October 2006 - 05:54 PM.

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