Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

Microsoft Outlook 2003


  • Please log in to reply

#1
waynf

waynf

    Member 1K

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,034 posts
I tried to send a wav file yesterday utilizing compression. The size of the original file was 32 megs. After compression it appeared to be 18 megs. What is the maximum allowable size permissable or possible for sending over internet utilizing Accelerated Dial-up.

When I tried to send it, it took close to two hours to send, and then eventually server shut down do to inactivity.

I called my inernet service provider and they advised me to compress files for such action, but obviously this was not enough.

I noticed on Yahoo services, maxium allowable file size is 2 megs. How does this compare with the following message I received as an article from "Welcome to Microsoft Outlook" that I received when I first opened up Microsoft Outlook.

data files larger than 2 gigabytes (GB), full Unicode support, usability improvements throughout the product,

Regards

ps: Would Hi-speed solve my problem.?
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
Retired Tech

Retired Tech

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 20,563 posts
Did you ask if they cut the connection after two hours anyway
  • 0

#3
waynf

waynf

    Member 1K

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,034 posts
I just talked to phone company and when I asked about shut off time, I didn't really get an answer, however I was told not to send a file in excess of 1 megabyte. However this morning I sent an e-mail with a photographic file(1.92 megs) to Victoria and Albert Museum in England, and it went through in a matter of minutes. In view of this deveopemnet it brings up another question of when a file is compressed to zip or rar, what is the amount of compression(50%) or what.
  • 0

#4
Retired Tech

Retired Tech

    Retired Staff

  • Retired Staff
  • 20,563 posts
The best way is to look at the before and after size as it can vary with the type of file being compressed

It is common for an ISP in the UK to auto disconnect dial up connections after 2 hours

If you use this type of service then you can send larger files

http://www.spread-it.com/

Just fill in your details, no need to put anything for recipient, click upload, when it has finished it shows the link, copy that and send it to the recipient so they can download the file (within 14 days)

You also get the link sent to your e-mail so you could wait for that and copy the link from there
  • 0

#5
david.ned40

david.ned40

    New Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
Hi

If you are using Microsoft Outlook 2003 then you cannot store more than 2 GB size data. You have option to upgrade it by un-installing older version and install new Outlook edition on your PC manually or with the help PST upgrade software. But when you upgrade then you will 2 GB in (Microsoft Outlook 97 to 2002) to 20 GB (Microsoft Outlook 2003 - 2010) or 50 GB (Microsoft Outlook 2013) according to your version selection.
After selection MS Outlook edition you will found store size but Outlook speed will get slow after crossing Oversize 2GB data, so in that case you can compress it by using third party compress Outlook PST 2010. For more go on this page: Compress PST software
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP