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Replacing CPU Cooler


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#1
BARROS

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Hello,

I am planning to change the CPU cooler on my pc within the next week or 2. I would be grateful if someone could please explain to me the entire process of changing the cooler.

Steps such as using TIM remover and so on would be grateful. Also what type of TIM remover to get etc...

(I am going to buy the Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 PRO)



Cheers :whistling: :blink:
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#2
SRX660

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I am assuming you are using on a intel 775 processor.

Unscrew the 4 clips outside the fins of the stock cooler. They should popup a little bit when they unlock.
Carefullp pry up evenly on the whole heatsink unit. Intel uses those pads with stickum to seal the cpu to the heatsink. A little twisting movement can break the sticky paste loose( very slight back and forth movement).
Now with heatsink off, unclip the 775 processor and pull it out so you can use rubbing alcohol to clean off all traces of the heatsink compound. The processor pulls straight up and out easily as it is just sitting on the pins.

After cleaning the cpu, replace it back in the Motherboard and clamp it down again. If you look the processor can only go in one way. Look for the corner with a triangle cutoff it. match up that with the cpu socket.

Now the 775 procesor has a very large surface for the heatsink to cover so i use 4 BB sized dabs of heatsink compound in a circle around the center of the cpu and use my index finger with a sandwich baggy over it to spread the compound out in a even layer overs the surface. I try to cover the whole area with a thin layer all the way to the edges of the clamp but not enough to cause a buildup ridge at the clamp edges.

Now i will put a veryvery thin layer of compound on the heatsink bottom and then set it on place on the processor. Have just enough compound that you can see a haze of compound. This will ensure good contact with the proc. I now hold the heatsink down with one hand lightly( really just three fingers and my thumb)and don't worry if you have to fumble around with the screws somewhat just as long as you dont have to lift the heatsink off the processor. It will get a good seal. I use a long shank skinny screwdriver to turn the screws the quarter turn necessary to lock them in. Put some pressure down on the screws or you wont get the screw in the socket. Take your time and be somewhat careful. When you get them right and you try twisting slightly with the hand holding the heatsink down it should move very little.

AND your DONE.

Lots of people push all kinds of thermal compound but i have not found where the high priced spread is that much better. One or two degrees is not enough to get me into a lather. I have the ceramic compound simply because i ran across someone selling one ounce tubes of the stuff at discount so i bought 100 tubes. I really don't see where its WAY cooler than the artic silver or even the white zinc oxide standard thermal paste. I've tried them all so i just stick with what i can find.

TIM ? Heres a article on it.

http://www.overclockers.com/tips1116/

http://www.sidewinde...kticpuhecl.html

http://www.modsynerg...nothermbadz.htm

I hope this helps you.

SRX660
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#3
BARROS

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Cheers man for your time :whistling: - Good Instructions.

Thing is, I dont really want to take out the processor incase I screw up or somethin so I was thinking i will do my best to remove as much TIM (Thermal Interface Material - aka Arctic Silver 5 etc...) while the CPU is in its socket.

i will be extra carefull when applying the TIM remover :blink:


Any other pointers would be great
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#4
SRX660

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After removing the stock heatsink off the motherboard, the easist part of the whole process is removing the CPU. Just lift up the lever, flip the surround clip over and pick the cpu up by 2 edges straight up and out of the cpu socket. You do not have to worry about bending the pins as the 775 processors do not have pins. The have round half balls that sit on the pins in the socket. You will somtimes read the new sockets use BGA( ball Grid Array)and this is what they are talking about. In reality most people have come to realize the processors are really LGA(Land Grid Array) and they are calling them that now.

About 3/4 down this website page it shows you the difference between the old pin cpu annd the LGA ball type new cpu.

http://www.pcstats.c...?articleID=1790

Also notice the 2 keys on the sides of the 775 processor. these keys will only let you install the cpu one way and no other. So you really cant go wrong pulling the processor to clean it. But you can clean it with cue-tips from the outside in if you are unsure. Every method works if its done right.

SRX660
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#5
BARROS

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I didnt know pentium 4's LGA775 didnt have pins :whistling: (I have the pentium 4 516 processor btw)

So what you are saying is that I should remove it and place it on a soft, non metallica surface, such as a table cloth?? or a rubber mat??

Edited by BARROS, 22 October 2006 - 09:44 AM.

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#6
SRX660

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I guess i do too many of these. I am a bit rough in that i just set them on a clean piece of cardboard box material, and clean off the top surface without even holding them down. I haven't had any fail as of yet.

SRX660
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