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#1
lamuskrat

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I apologize for my ignorance but all this is confusing. I have had a pc for many years and just recently see the need to send this media via email. So my question is: if I have music, video, or just like sermons on cd, how do I send it by email. Do I convert and how do I do that?

Mike

I have looked into archive posts and didn't find my answer...thnx

Edited by lamuskrat, 22 October 2006 - 03:49 PM.

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#2
pip22

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You don't need to convert any files to send them as email attachments, though you should 'zip' them up into a Windows XP zip-folder to make them smaller where possible. Video files tend to be quite large compared to a document file, and you may find that your ISP has a limit on the size of emails you can send.

Just create an empty zip-folder and drag your video files or whatever into it. Open your email client, compose whatever text you want to send, then go to "Insert>File" in the menu (Microsoft Outlook). Navigate to the Desktop in the dialogue box and choose the zip-folder you created. Highlight that file and click 'Insert'. The email is now ready to send, complete with attachment.

One thing to watch which many people overlook. Make sure the recipient has the necessary application required to open the files you send. Best thing to do is stick with file formats that are standard in Windows and which everyone will have the ability to open, such as JPEG for photos, MPEG or WMV for video, WMA or MP3 for audio, and TXT or RTF for text files. If you do send any file formats not standard in Windows (eg a Microsoft Access database, check first that the recipient has Microsoft Access on his/her PC.

Edited by pip22, 23 October 2006 - 02:57 AM.

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#3
lamuskrat

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Thank you. Your assistance is greatly appreciated.
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