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Took the step and downloaded Firefox


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#1
Queen Mum

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Is it possible or wise to remove files that were part of Internet Explorer ... example hot fixes?

If we ever return to IE we can reload what is needed ... so why keep more clutter than necessary on a system that is already 'behind the times' ...

ME OS .. 128.0 MB RAM ..
38.1GB HD (i think, but i'm not that puter savvy to know for sure .. just see the pie chart when looking in window)
but do know I'm down to 66% resources as i type this ... arrgh!

TY :whistling:

Edited by Queen Mum, 31 October 2006 - 05:24 PM.

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#2
pip22

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"resources" in this context refers to the various allocations of system memory (RAM) used by the operating system and applications, not the amount of disk-space you have left. To improve your free resources therefore you would need to install more RAM, not delete files.

Moreover, some of those 'hot fixes' will also be fixes for Outlook Express which is a component of Internet Explorer. Since they are both closely related it would be unwise to remove any of the hot-fixes. And having removed them, you may need to use IE in an emergency (if, for example, FF starts misbehaving) and you may forget that some of the fixes have been removed, leaving you vulnerable to whatever the fix was designed to prevent.

For myself, I also have two web-browsers installed but I keep them both fully up to date with any patches that are released because I often find that I need to use them both at different times (for example, you can't use FF to download from Windows Update -- that needs IE because of a patented Microsoft technology called 'ActiveX' which FF doesn't have. Not only that, you'll find that even today some websites just won't load properly in anything other than IE.

Multimedia playback is also a 'no brainer' in IE whereas in FF you need to do a bit of 'hoop-jumping' to get things like Quicktime and RealPlayer to work.
I'm not knocking FF, but I have used it and I know what it's weaknesses are, so keep IE fully fixed and ready to take over when you need it most!

Edited by pip22, 01 November 2006 - 03:37 AM.

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#3
Queen Mum

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:whistling: I understand why it would NOT be wise to do that and I Thank You!
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