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College Major?


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#16
-Vandros-

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well i'm in fl, but anywhere would be fine
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#17
Facedown98

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So am I lol What part? Stetson has a good program near Orlando. There's a few others out there too. The best thing to do is have your guidance counselor do some research for you. No doubt he/she will have some background on what's good.
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#18
-Vandros-

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southwest, just opposite of Miami
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#19
Facedown98

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Have you tried any searches on the College Board website? That will bring you a list of them.
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#20
Daniiel

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Hey
Im just curious,
What could i do in later life if i were to study Physics and Chemistry at uni?
Thats the way it looks like im headed.
I really enjoy the stuff
I guess im only 15 and in year 11 this year.
I hope i dont loose the feeling for these subjects.
Or im pretttty screwed, i cant change my elected classes or itll ruin my chance at a school certificate and my chance of uni (theres tafe ofcourse).
I donno if some of this wont make sense to you guys cause i live in Australia.
We might have different things / names for things
Thanks for your help
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#21
Pi rules

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For physics would could become many things: a teacher, researcher, design vehicles/machines, etc. Do you like more of the mechanical, electrical/magnetic, or theoretical type of physics?

For chemistry there are also many occupations you could have: again, a teacher, researcher. Again, there are many parts of chemistry.

The main thing is to go into a field you like. I love science, but I love computers a little more.
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#22
Daniiel

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ohh thanks,
I would have to say my favourite is theoretical physics
i use to be really into computers but now ive lost interest im not sure why
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#23
Kat

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Another thing I haven't seen mentioned is computer forensics. This is a fast growing field, very interesting, and can be highly lucrative. You can end up working for local law enforcement, or even the FBI.
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#24
Pi rules

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Good point, I hadn't considered that one. Computer Security is pretty interesting to me. I started studying for a competition this Saturday and may study for the Security+ Certification. And, it would be cool to work for the FBI.
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#25
Facedown98

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It sounds interesting :whistling:

Consider it a big option! :blink:
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#26
warriorscot

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I don't know about the US but they are telling allot of High school students to avoid anything forensic as the job market in that field is already over saturated and career wise you can get a good job with it just not doing forensic work. Its also not very glamorous like it is on TV.
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#27
Daniiel

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Yehh i rekon warriorscots right.
They make it look so cool and easy on tv
like they press acouple of buttons and get into a satilite and so on
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#28
h_mike

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Well the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) CIA (Central Intelligence Agency), ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms), along with MI (Military Intelligence), and other agencies that have to do with law enforcement are hard to get in. They usually require a lot of previous local law enforcement in a field your familiar with. If you're good with physics, I suggest Forensics like others have stated. If you are good with Reconnaissance I suggest the FBI, CIA, or MI (you would have to be enlisted in the Armed Forces). Going to a university and getting a degree can open a lot of opportunities, especially if it has to do with science. Like myself, I plan on getting a Criminal Justice degree, and becoming Military Police in the GAARNG (Georgia Army National Guard). Then hopefully 3-4 years down the road depending on the option that is on my contract for the years I signed up with, I could reclass to Infantry again and become an Army Ranger. Degrees mean a lot. I suggest going with what you originally planned, and that would be science I suppose. Good luck Daniel.
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#29
MatthewG

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I am studying EE at Kettering University, MI. I remember thinking about my major in high school so hopefully I can give a little assistance. Heres what I know and think about different degrees-

EE- obviously I like it, it offers both the coding and hardware aspect of electronics. When you are done you have the base knowledge to understand the operation of most all electronic components. There is a heavy emphasis on math and physics, which are difficult, but you just do what you gotta do. By the time your done you can really take the hardware or software aspect to its limit.

CS- You will code a lot. You will learn languages that code in high levels, down to the lowest level of code. You will look inside components and understand registers, bits, etc to the fullest. You can get into special encryption/security classes, networking, anything really. This seems like a cool degree, but if you become a programmer or software engineer, you will most likely be at a computer 8+ hours a day getting up to take a leak, eat, or go to a meeting. This degree also requires the math and physics.

Physics, applied- Well, you will be doing a lot of math, just applied. We are lucky and can make use of programs like matLab for code related graphing/data organization, but you will still learn how to do it all by hand. This does take electromagnetics, fiber optics, and quantum subjects into a deeper level than most other degrees though.

Physics, theoretical- I think you have to know this is what you want to do. I dont know anyone taking a degree stressing theory, but first of all it is just as tough as applied physics, just with abstract subjects. You have to like to read, do math, and compute.


Now in the real world anyone of these degrees can have you doing the anything. I work with a lot of EE's and they are everything from high up supervisors, to managers, to programmers, to hardware deisgners. For my goals, EE was right because its versatile, you can take it into a lot of directions, mine which is most likely military. I also have to mention that my school is based around a co-op program, we work 3 months, study 3 moths, year long non-stop. For example a CS student can study his CS at school, then in his work term he can work on real projects with a large company writing code or doing design, etc. I cant say enough good things about this program, you work with a variety of people, all with the same interests, its just there already at the professional level; you can learn so much, so fast this way. Well hope that helped, good luck!
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#30
Phil

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I'm off to Uni to do a degree in Computer Science in September (I'm in the UK). It's quite a rounded degree covering quite a lot of programming (YAY), some networking, general computing principals and the whatnot. Seems to me quite a good course when I really enjoy coding but am interested in other aspects also.

~Phil~
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