Jump to content

Welcome to Geeks to Go - Register now for FREE

Geeks To Go is a helpful hub, where thousands of volunteer geeks quickly serve friendly answers and support. Check out the forums and get free advice from the experts. Register now to gain access to all of our features, it's FREE and only takes one minute. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more.

Create Account How it Works
Photo

HP M7300E Media Center


  • Please log in to reply

#1
Marty L Mayes

Marty L Mayes

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 68 posts
Yes I have a list to go buy for my ram, 256/512 DDR CL=3 UNBUFFERED NON-ECC DDR 2.6V 64X64
What is the diffrance between, non-ecc, and registered, ram.
  • 0

Advertisements


#2
pip22

pip22

    Trusted Tech

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,663 posts
ECC RAM:
has error-correction built into it. ECCC RAM tends to be slightly more expensive than an equivalent non-ECC chip. ECC modules can be identified by counting the number of memory chips. If it's an odd number then one of the chips is for error-correction. An even number means it's non-ECC. ECC and non-ECC are also referred to as parity or non-parity respectively. Pretty much all denominations of RAM are available in both ECC and non-ECC versions, and motherboards don't really care which you use, though you should only use one kind in any given computer.
The vast majority of RAM currently in use is non-ECC. Pretty much only highly sensitive, mission-critical applications require ECC-type RAM, as personal and most commercial computing gets along just fine without it, and the error-correction tends to cause a performance hit.

Buffered RAM:
A term used to describe a memory module that contains buffers. The buffers re-drive the data through the memory chips and allow the module to be built with a greater number of memory chips. Buffered and unbuffered RAM cannot be mixed. The design of the computer's memory controller dictates which type of RAM must be used.

Edited by pip22, 22 November 2006 - 02:00 PM.

  • 0

#3
Marty L Mayes

Marty L Mayes

    Member

  • Topic Starter
  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 68 posts
Cool thanks, I learn something new every day from you guys. yall are the greatest. I'm very greatful for all your help, all of you. I only hope to be a good as helper as yall some day, and recieve a higher ranking as a geeks to go member.
  • 0






Similar Topics

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

As Featured On:

Microsoft Yahoo BBC MSN PC Magazine Washington Post HP