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Question about changing onboard graphics


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#1
r2zoo

r2zoo

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I have an Asus M2V-TVM motherboard(before you say anything bad about Asus MBs, our class had 22 of them, and they all worked) and under the bios, theres an option to change the Onboard Graphics from 64mb(not sure what the unit was) up to a max of 256. Im sorry that I really cant be more specfic, but as its at school, I really didnt remember the specfics wording, and I was unable to find the manual online, not that the actual manual helped me in figuring out my question.

My question is, is it possible to increase the "power" of the onboard graphics? If, say I changed it from 64mb to 128mb, would I have better graphical performence? Im sorry to ask with such small details, but I will have the full details tommorow.

I know id be better off with a graphics card, but money is very tight for me, so its out of the question.

Specs of the machine.
Asus M2V-TVM Motherboard
768mb of DDR2 Ram(1;128mb stick, 1;512mb stick)
80gb Hardrive
DVD/CD combo drive
AMD athlon 64 3200+


If more details are needed let me know!
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#2
Neil Jones

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Onboard graphics, by the fact that they take a chunk out of the computer's memory and are powered by the rest of the board, are basically cheap solutions, the amount of memory you throw at them has largely become irrelevant, and so doesn't "boost" them.

In the old days, most graphics solutions allowed you to run in either 16 colours or 256 colours, but you needed a graphics card that had enough memory on it to cope with the extra colours. As time went on, we were introduced to 16/24/32bit graphical colours on the screen, and processors, along with computer architecture changed to such a degree where you didn't need a super-duper card to put pretty colours on the screen because the rest of the system made up for it.

These days you don't even need 1Mb of memory to make 32-bit colour, as many boards can happily do it on half a megabyte, technology has changed so much. Therefore onboard graphics with their 64Mb has fallen behind with the times and is favoured by those who sell/build PCs as an "all-in-one" solution because its cheaper, so changing the option to 128Mb makes very little difference except take up more memory. It may allow you to use higher resolutions but that's about it.
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#3
r2zoo

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Thanks, all the manual tells me basically is "Using this option you can change between 64mb/128mb/etc" not what it actually does or anything. Once again thanks.
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