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christmascardsanta.com application


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#1
nschick

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Someone I know sent me an ecard from christmascardsanta.com and it's asking me to download a program. It's called santa.exe (if I go to the site and don't use the email link). The email link has some numbers after the word santa, I'm assuming thats my card number. Do any of you know if it's safe to download this or is it a virus/spyware??


Thanks in advance!
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#2
Retired Tech

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If you post the link, I will see what the options are, generally, you do not have to install anything to view e-cards
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#3
nschick

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This is exactly what the email says:

Merry Christmas from Edson
Hi, I wanted to wish you an early Christmas. So I am send you something cool. Check out the FuAni card I made for you.

You will like it :whistling:

Go here to see the card I sent for you or copy and paste the following into your browser
http://www.christmas...amp;to_pageid=2



Bye,

Edson
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#4
Neil Jones

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According to IE7, the link in the email is safe.
According to Firefox, the link in the email is a Phishing URL and should be avoided.

But having said that, if you are asked to download anything to view a card, proceed with caution.

Edited by Neil Jones, 01 December 2006 - 03:48 PM.

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#5
Retired Tech

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Most e-cards run like this, maybe you go via an ad which you can skip. I wouldn't install anything to view an e-card.

http://www.fun-greet...s.com/u/mc3.htm
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#6
KorrMuraan

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It's phishing site definately, the second page asks for your account passwords for your hotmail/yahoo/gmail/aol accounts.
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#7
jinglebells

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!!! :whistling:
i just gave my email password and stuff in that fuAni card email!
wad will happen ?
anything serious?
and wad is a phishing site may i know?
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#8
Retired Tech

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Change your password(s)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In computing, phishing is a criminal activity using social engineering techniques. Phishers attempt to fraudulently acquire sensitive information, such as passwords and credit card details, by masquerading as a trustworthy person or business in an electronic communication. Phishing is typically carried out using email or an instant message, although phone contact has been used as well[1]. Attempts to deal with the growing number of reported phishing incidents include legislation, user training, and technical measures.

The first recorded mention of phishing is on the alt.online-service.america-online Usenet newsgroup on January 2, 1996,[2] although the term may have appeared even earlier in the print edition of the hacker magazine 2600.[3] The term phishing is a variant of fishing[4], probably influenced by phreaking,[5][6] and alludes to the use of increasingly sophisticated lures to "fish" for users' financial information and passwords. The word may also be linked to leetspeak, in which ph is a common substitution for f.[7] The popular theory that it is a portmanteau of password harvesting[8] is an example of folk etymology.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phishing

http://www.antiphishing.org/
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