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Outlook 2003 won't open


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#16
piper

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No, that is within the size limitations for Outlook 2003, as long as the PST file was not originally created in Outlook 2002 or earlier (which would only have happened if you upgraded to 2003).

See Microsoft article 830336 for additional information.
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#17
DOS2XP

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I started with Office 2003 on my new computer two years ago. I imported the old emails from Office 2000 when I upgraded. I've had no problems until just last Friday when our power went on and off with my system on (I wonder if that's even related to my poroblem).

Anyway, regarding your previous email, I have Windows xp SP2. I'm pretty sure I have the lastest critical updates - I have it set to auto update.
Yes, I have an external USB external harddrive as well as an external USB CD-RW.
I did the scandisk. No errors showed.
I've completed the MEMTEST overnight. I stopped it this morning without ERRORS.

:whistling:
Art
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#18
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Did you run checkdisk on both the hard drive and the external drive?

1. Let's try removing your PST file. You won't lose anything. This just prevents Outlook from trying to open it when it starts.

Click Start, Control Panel, Mail, Data Files. Highlight your file, click Remove. If you get a message about it's being a mail account, cancel and move on to #2.

2. Set up a new mail profile. ** You'll need your email account settings to complete this. This does not affect your Windows User Account in any way. Your current PST file will still be on your computer, so you'll be able to retrieve contacts, calendar items, emails, etc. (unless the file is completely corrupt).

Click Start, Control Panel, Mail, Show Profiles. If you need to write down your existing settings, highlight your current profile, Properties, Email Account, Next.

Then go back to Control Panel, Mail, click Add to add a new profile. Go through the steps to set up your email account.
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#19
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I left off an important step - after you set up a new profile, go back to Mail, Show Profiles and change the lower part of the screen to either "Prompt" you for a profile or "Always Use" your new profile.

Open Outlook.
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#20
DOS2XP

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Yes, I figured it out. Thanks. I'm testing it now. I've stored a lot of emails on my server at my service provider so it's taking awhile to download them all. Outlook immediately started working with the new profile and it's staying opened! I'm waiting for the messages to complete it's download. I will report back afterwards.

If this new profile works, what does it mean about my old profile? How will I be able to access my old profile (it's called Outlook.pst), which is 3GB in size.

:whistling:
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#21
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After I retrieved all mail, I closed Outlook. Then tried opening Outlook, but the same thing happened - it opened, but just before the inbox was supposed to open, the application closed.

:whistling:
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#22
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I have a feeling you've got a bad email trying to download from your mail server. I don't know if it's a virus or has an extremely large attachment. Log in to your web mail and see what's there. Delete anything that looks suspicious.

To get stuff from your old PST file (from Microsoft article 287070).
1. On the File menu, click Import And Export. If the menu item is not available, hover your pointer over the chevrons at the bottom of the menu, and then click Import and Export.
2. Click Import from another program or file., and then click Next.
3. Click Personal Folder File (.pst), and then click Next.
4. Type the path and the name of the .pst file that you want to import, and then click Next.
5. Select the folder that you want to import, or select the top of the hierarchy to import everything, and then click Finish.
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#23
DOS2XP

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Bad email is a good suggestion, but I'm not sure if that is the problem.

The reason I say that is that I did the new profile process twice. The first time it downloaded my emails, nothing was left on the server because I didn't set it to save my messages using my new profile. So the second time I created the new profile (removing the first), I only downloaded less than 10 emails from today. And, it still failed to reopen.

Art
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#24
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This has just about got me stumped!

Please check your web mail just to ensure that there's not a bad email trying to download.

If you have any real-time antivirus, antispyware, etc., protection and scanning, disable it completely. Perhaps it's scanning the mail as it downloads and is somehow causing the conflict that closes Outlook.

You might also run a registry cleaner. I recommend Easy Cleaner by ToniArts. You can download it here.

*** Be very careful when editing the registry. Backup the registry or set a system restore point before making changes.

Finally, uninstall Outlook, reboot, run the registry cleaner, reinstall Outlook. If you want to save any existing PST files, copy them to your desktop or My Documents (to be on the safe side). You can import them at a later time.

And this one may fall under the "really stretching it" category, but set up a new user profile for Windows (in the Administrator group). Go to Control Panel, User Accounts. Log in with the new user, open Outlook, configure your email account and see if Outlook opens okay.

Edited by LindaGail, 20 December 2006 - 10:14 PM.

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#25
DOS2XP

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I'll try the uninstall/install after Christmas. I've gotten pretty busy, but I will post my results after reinstalling OUTLOOK and running the Registry cleaner - look for me.

Have a Merry Christmas and thank you for all your suggestions, LindaGail.
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#26
DOS2XP

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I'm back.

I did the following recently with no results. Outlook window opens, but then closes just as the application opens to the message area.

1. Turned off antivirus scanning, disabled completely.
2. Uninstalled Outlook, rebooted, ran registry cleaner, reinstalled Outlook.

However, setting up a new User Account and logging on with the new user, Outlook works!

What is this saying about my "real" Logon?
:whistling:
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#27
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Well, setting up a new Windows user account did it. That would mean something is corrupt in your old user profile.

Okay, then you'll need to copy all the settings (desktop and other settings) from your old profile to the new one.

From Microsoft article 555473:

Login to the old account again and perform the following:

Right-click My Computer, and select Properties.
Select the Advanced tab.
Click the Settings button in the User Profiles section.
Select the user account that was corrupted.
Click the Copy To button.
Click Browse button and then browse For Folder dialog box to locate the Documents and Settings folder and select the new account.

A confirmation dialog box should appear that informs you that the original files will be deleted and prompts you to confirm the copy operation. Click Yes.
Once the profile is copied, log off from the system and login again with the new username. All the settings of the old account will be copied.

I don't know if this process actually copies My Documents, so be sure check (and copy manually if necessary) before you delete the old user folder under Documents and Settings.

After this, you should be all good, but if not, please post back.
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#28
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I got my Outlook back to normal operation! I'm all set up with my new User Account. I didn't set it up according to the insturctions, but I got all my pertinent files copied manually.

I didn't know this, but I was logged on as an Administrator. I didn't realize this until I read the link in article 555473, which referred to article 326688 that noted that the Aministrator Account is created automatically when I install Windows XP. I just never created an account for myself when I built my system two years ago.

I appreciate all your suggestions which lead up to a successful recovery of Outlook. I lost some of my latest eMail messages becasue I forgot to check the box for "Leave a copy of messages on the server." when I was experimenting with new profile setups. I looks like in my case, it falls under the "really stretching it" category!

I know it's a different topic, but I have to figure out if I can ever log back on as an Administrator for as now, I don't see it as a choice at Log on to switch users.

Thank you,

Art
:whistling:
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#29
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I'm so glad your Outlook is working!

Yes, you can log in as Administrator. In Windows XP Home, the only was is to boot into Safe Mode. With Windows XP Professional, there are some additional options. See this link called "How to Login as Administrator in Windows XP".
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#30
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LindaGail:

Thank you again for your diligence and explicit instructions; and your clear understanding of my problem.

I had also sent an email Service Request to Microsoft, but their response was not immediate - in fact, it was after the fact. Their approach was similar in that the first thing they wanted me to do was to create a new Outlook profile. However, if I had to rely solely them, I would have to be extremely patient as some steps were vague.
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