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Programs Not Responding when saving or opening files


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#1
Phlegmbot

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Okay, this problem is most likely related to the fact that when I sent my computer in for repair (sans HDD) a few weeks back, I used an enclosure to use my HDD on ANOTHER computer. I'm not sure WHY exactly that's caused problems, but the computer's been a little sluggish on file searches and the like ever since.

The HDD is BACK in my laptop computer, but the main problem NOW is this:

Let's say I'm exploring files. The dialog box opens showing the default folder in which to save or open files, right? Right.

As soon as I click the "up" button or click another folder in that window, OR as soon as I click a file to open or a file to save over, the hourglass appears and that program stops responding. This seems to be connected mostly (or solely) to video or picture files as it hasn't happened in Word or WinAmp.

By connecting the HDD to another computer then putting it back in here, have I somehow screwed up some sort of associations the computer makes w/images? Initially I was having a problem w/thumbnails but that was fixed.

I'm probably going to run a WinXP repair, but in anticipation of having to reinstall all my drivers, I'm hoping to avoid it. =\

Thanks!
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#2
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You can try either of these, both will take as long, neither should affect the installed drivers

Items in blue which are underlined are clickable to give more information about the process

Click start then run, type prefetch then press enter, click edit then select all, right click any file then click delete, confirm delete

Click start, all programmes, accessories, system tools to run disc clean up, then from system tools, run disc defragmenter.

Click start then run, type sfc /scannow then press enter, you need the XP CD

Windows File Protection will show a blue onscreen progress bar, when the bar goes, reboot

If you do not have an XP CD you can borrow a same version as was originally installed XP CD, if you downloaded SP2 then you need an SP1 XP CD

If you do not have an XP CD and are unable to borrow one, run the scan, click skip if it asks for the CD, if it keeps asking, click cancel.

If it kept asking for the XP CD then system files are missing


Click start then run, type chkdsk /f /r then press enter, type Y to confirm for next boot, press enter then reboot.

Windows will appear to load normally then either the monitor will show progress or the screen will go blank, do not disturb this.

This will take an hour or so before it gets to the desktop.

Download and install Tune Up 2007 Trial

Run Tune Up Disc Clean Up

Run Tune Up Registry Clean Up

Click Optimize and Improve to run Reg Defrag, which will take a few minutes and need a reboot. You should disable the antivirus programme to run this and check it is running after the reboot

After the reboot, click optimize then system optimizer to optimize the computer, select computer with an internet connection from the drop down menu, this also requires a reboot

After the reboot, click optimize then system optimizer to accelerate downloads, select the speed just above your actual connection speed, this requires a reboot

After the reboot, click optimize then system optimizer to run system advisor



Or

You can use this guide to repair XP

Possibly, you will need to press the power button and keep tapping the delete key, (possibly F2) until the PC enters set up. Change the boot order to CD ROM Drive then hard drive, press F10 then press enter, load the XP CD then type Y then press enter, as it reboots, look for press any key to load from CD, press enter

You will need your XP product key to complete this

The XP Product Key is a 25 character alpha numerical code, which does not include the sequence OEM


If you have audio / video files which are subject to DRM you should check with the provider for known issues with performing an XP repair install

Click this to view the XP Repair Install Guide

Windows XP repair feature won't delete your data, installed programs, personal information, or settings. It just repairs the operating system

The XP repair install will look and run as a normal install, however, you must not see a request to format the drive


After running XP Repair you will need to install all Windows Updates

Microsoft Update
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#3
Phlegmbot

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Wow.

Okay, I'll try those out in a day or 2 and report the results!

Thank you!!
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#4
Phlegmbot

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Hi, Keith...

Well, I ran ALL of the software in your reply.

About halfway through, I realized none of these things you were suggesting were really zeroing in on my issue, but doing some general clean-ups. That's cool, no prob...I did them anyway.

They didn't work...that is, they didn't resolve my issue...although they did a nice cleaning on the computer.

So then I did the XP repair.

DURING the repair, I received the following 5 errors in this order:

1. Specified procedure could not be found...failed to load library...system32\catsrv.dll

2. "error ocurred loading..." then the path and file: commonfiles\system\directdb.dll... and it ended w/"not installed or corrupted"

similar errors for: 3. system32\inetcomm.dll 4. outlookexpress\msoe.dll 5. commonfiles\system\wab32.dll


It continued w/the repair and eventually ATTEMPTED to get into Windows, but INSTEAD, I got the following message: "Not enough virtual memory or paging file Quota is available to complete the specified operation."


And now I cannot get into Windows. Not in Safe Mode, not by rolling back to the last setting that worked and not in any other way I can figure. The computer just does a continuous loop of loading up w/the Toshiba Welcome screen, attempting to go into windows, and showing the above-mentioned "virtual memory" message then going back to my Toshiba welcome screen...and continues until I shut 'er off.

This WinXP CD worked previously. And the computer had rebooted several times earlier that day (thanks to to Tune Up 2007).

So, okay, any ideas to get me back into Windows??? Are these items missing b/c of the tweaks?

If you're uncertain, please, please recruit some others here at the site for advice.

Thanks for the time you're giving me.

Phlegmbot
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#5
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Boot the PC using the XP CD and look for a prompt to 'Press any key to boot from CD' (some systems may not ask).

Press any key on the keyboard and Windows Setup will launch

After a few minutes you will be presented with the following choices:


To setup Windows® XP now. press Enter

To Repair a Windows® XP installation using Recovery Console, press R

To quit setup without installing XP, press F3


Press R to repair the Windows® XP installation

The next screen will ask you which Windows® installation you would like to log on to. Normally the following will be listed:

1: C:\WINDOWS

Press 1 and then Enter to continue.

You may now be asked for the Administrator password. If you know this type it and press Enter. If you don't know the Administrators password it may be blank. Just press Enter

At the command prompt type:


chkdsk /r

Press Enter

Chkdsk will now check the hard drive for errors, and will attempt to repair any it finds.

This process may take a while, but when finished will go back to the same command prompt as before.

Turn off and restart the computer.

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#6
Phlegmbot

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Hey again.

3. questions:

1. will this erase any of my data files? I brought the hdd to a CompUSA to check, and, so far, they're still in tact.

2. is there anything I should keep my out for as a sort-of warning that my data COULD get lost (like a system question or warning or something)?

3. I was lucky enough that when Toshiba fixed the hardware issues w/my notebook (for deets, see my last Topic by searching my handle) they accidentally sent me ANOTHER hdd, formatted as it would be "out of the box"...using that HDD is how I'm online and using my computer now. Will trading out the HDDs back and forth like this f--- anything up?

THANK YOU!!!!

Edited by Phlegmbot, 31 December 2006 - 12:09 AM.

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#7
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Nothing in post 5 would affect data

You could try this, then if windows loads you can run the check disk from there

Items in blue which are underlined are clickable to give more information about the process

Start the System Restore Utility at a command prompt

1. Restart your computer, and keep tapping F8 during the initial start-up until you get options, select Safe Mode with a Command Prompt then press enter.

2. Log on to your computer with an administrator account or with an account that has administrator credentials.

3. Type the following command at a command prompt, and then press ENTER:

%systemroot%\system32\restore\rstrui.exe

4. Follow the instructions that appear on the screen to restore your computer to an earlier state.

Look for the most recent system checkpoint created before the errors to restore from

For additional information about the Safe mode with a command prompt, click 315222 to see a description of the Safe Mode Boot Options in Windows XP

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#8
Phlegmbot

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Thanks, Keith.

I had already tried to get in Safe Mode w/Command Prompt -- can't get in.

Also tried to Restore from a Checkpoint after hitting F8, that didn't work either.

BTW, what about my third question? The concept of changing out HDDs back and forth in the same computer (both of which were formatted for THIS computer and CAME WITH this computer). Can pulling out my current HDD and putting BACK the old one mess anything up either internally OR on these HDDs?

Another thanks!...and a bow. (Hey, why not.)
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#9
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As it is a laptop, use the better hard drive

What are you looking to do by swapping them?
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#10
Phlegmbot

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Okay, Keith, I'll try to clarify:

Since I cannot get into Windows any longer on my HDD, I am using a SECOND HDD that I was lucky enough to get when Toshiba fixed some hardware issues w/my notebook (for deets, see my last Topic by searching my handle) -- they accidentally sent me this extra HDD.

This OTHER hdd, which is what is CURRENTLY in my laptop, is formatted as if the computer is new, "out of the box."

I put this HDD in, and took out the other one, solely to get online, to come to this site and see what you recommended next, because I am trapped out of Windows on the other.

The other one however has ALL of my settings and files (only about half of which have been backed-up [was working on it slowly but surely]). Again, THAT is the HDD that is not letting me into Windows.

So: Will trading out the HDDs back and forth like this mess anything up? In other words, can it cause any kind of hardware or software issues?

Edited by Phlegmbot, 31 December 2006 - 03:07 AM.

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#11
Phlegmbot

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Okay, Keith, I'll try to clarify:

Since I cannot get into Windows any longer on my HDD, I am using a SECOND HDD that I was lucky enough to get when Toshiba fixed some hardware issues w/my notebook (for deets, see my last Topic by searching my handle) -- they accidentally sent me this extra HDD.

This OTHER hdd, which is what is CURRENTLY in my laptop, is formatted as if the computer is new, "out of the box."

I put this HDD in, and took out the other one, solely to get online, to come to this site and see what you recommended next, because I am trapped out of Windows on the other.

The other one however has ALL of my settings and files (only about half of which have been backed-up [was working on it slowly but surely]). Again, THAT is the HDD that is not letting me into Windows.

So: Will trading out the HDDs back and forth like this mess anything up? In other words, can it cause any kind of hardware issues?
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#12
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I would look at using a desktop PC to install the drive with the data on, as a slave drive, then transfer it onto DVDR discs and load it from those on to the new drive

I also wonder why Toshiba sent you a new drive, is it because they considered the original unreliable
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#13
Phlegmbot

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Keith,

Hi.

Well, I tried to do a WinXP repair, but I'm asked to enter a password. I don't have one, so I just hit Enter. It asked me for the pass 2 more times, then kicked me out of the repair.

According to Toshiba tech support (the worst tech support in the world but still...), they do not put a password on people's systems, and they feel that the reason this happened during the repair is that Windows has been corrupted beyond repair.

Possible? Any further ideas??

Also, here's an odd question: I've ordered an HDD enclosure (b/c I have that extra HDD). Once I have the enclosure I can, using my working WinXP, theoretically copy those files that are apparently missing in the BAD WinXP and paste them into the locations listed in the errors I mentioned in that post above. Could that mess things up further, or is it worth a shot?

Did I explain that so that it made sense?

Sorry, I know I threw a lot at you in this post.

Thanks yet again!!

Phlegmbot
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#14
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Do you have XP using the new drive, and nothing wrong?

If yes then I would use the HDD enclosure to get the data off on to the working XP

Then use a disk wiper on the other one
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#15
Phlegmbot

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Sighhh.

Yeah, that's the plan.

So, you're telling me there's NO way to get back into that repair unless I can get through that password thing, hm?

!@$%!

Edited by Phlegmbot, 02 January 2007 - 03:07 PM.

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