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Buy new computer or upgrade old computer


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#1
Thommie68

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Hello,

I have an older computer. It's a dell dimension 4100 series, Intel Pent III, 797 mhz and 128mb RAM. As you can imagine it's been churning a lot lately since i hooked up my 30gig Ipod. : )
My question is should i bother with adding more memory (I think you can only go to 512mb on this computer) or just get a new computer? I am leaning toward purchasing a new computer as i am pretty sure that this computer is dinosaur age - i bought it in 2000.

What do ya'll think?
thanks!
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#2
stettybet0

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well, what do you use it for? If it's just for word processing and web browsing, it should be fine. It could use some extra RAM though, and it will be able to do things much faster at 512mb than at 128mb!
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#3
Thommie68

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thanks, i don't use my computer to play games (I stopped video games at Atari. I would never get anything done if i started again! :whistling:
I just use it for word, web surfing and my ipod, so i suppose i don't need a whole new computer (boo! haha).
As long as more memory will get rid of the churning, slowness it's all good!

thank you for your reply!
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#4
stettybet0

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no problem.

of course, there's nothing wrong with getting a new computer. :whistling: But if you want to save a buck, maxing out the memory on this machine will do wonders. On my even more ancient machine, I went from 64mb to 256mb and it was like I had been traveling in molasses with 64 compared to 256.

Just make sure the memory is compatible! Most memory you see advertised won't work with oldie computers.

Some quick research showed that your PC needs PC133 RAM. two sticks of 256mb would do nicely.

Pretty much anything on this page should work:
http://www.newegg.co...SubCategory=147
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#5
Thommie68

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Interestingly enough, i had some memory to try out in my computer, but it did not seem to work. It's 256mb, SDRAM PC 133. I suppose i could have put it in wrong, but isn't there really only one way to make it fit in the slot?
Anyway, i got frustrated after trying to add more memory and decided to just get a new computer. Maybe i will try again, though.
THank you so much for your help and links!
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#6
stettybet0

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What exactly is the problem with it? Does the computer not recognize it? I'll assume this is the case. If so, try these solutions:

make sure your putting it in the right slot! It should go in a slot identical to the slot which your memory is in now.

If you are sure it is in the right slot, make sure it is in all the way. You should hear a clicking sound when it goes in.

Hope that helps!
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#7
james_8970

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Me being an idoit again :whistling:
James

Edited by james_8970, 04 January 2007 - 06:07 PM.

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#8
stettybet0

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first off, he only has two slots for RAM in his PC, so he must put them side by side. and second of all, you don't put dual channel RAM side by side, you put them in slots 1+3, and 2+4. And third of all, you can too use two sticks of RAM that you didn't buy in a package together in dual channel as they support it. (Which most newer sticks do. Of course, SDRAM doesn't, as it wasn't manufactured around the time when dual channel found its way into home computers.)

Edited by stettybet0, 04 January 2007 - 06:11 PM.

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#9
james_8970

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Woops. Learnt something new. I knew about the dual support being identical, worded that out wrong, just not where to put the sticks in. I thought it was side by side for some reason. Now i know for the future, thanx.
James

Edited by james_8970, 04 January 2007 - 06:07 PM.

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#10
stettybet0

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actually, they don't even have to be identical, or run at the same speeds even! you could have one 1gb stick of Corsiar DDR-400 RAM and a 512mb stick of Kingston DDR-333 RAM and if they both supported dual channel, they would theoretically work in dual channel (although at DDR-333 speed). However, it is much easier and much more reliable to have identical sticks, so it is generally recommended.
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#11
Thommie68

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wow, i am learning too! i tried everything and it seemed like the brand just didn't work which is odd cause it says it's specifically compatible with dell, but who knows...
Anyway, i decided to get a new computer and ya'll probably won't talk to me after this, but i got a MAC. It's been years since i have had one. Since i am not in a sit at your desk computer business world (I have changed careers and am becoming a nurse) it just seem to fit my needs better. Not to mention being new and different. We have another PC in the house too, so i am not totally without. :whistling:

My next order of business is to sell my Dell. I was told that I could get more money if I strip it and sell the parts. I will probably search this forum or start a new thread to see how to go about the stripping and what would be most valuable. If ya'll have any suggestions, or want to buy some parts, let me know! :blink:

Thank you so much for your help!
p.s. I am a "she", not a "he". I know the nickname can throw people, but it's from my last name.
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#12
stettybet0

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nothing wrong with a mac, and nothing wrong with being a male nurse, so it really doesn't matter what gender you are. :blink:

Nothing in a computer that old will be very valuable (the market for used old computer parts isn't that big). However, you might be able to sell parts to some geeks. As a matter of fact, I might like to buy the processor actually for an old computer I have. :whistling:

Edited by stettybet0, 05 January 2007 - 06:58 PM.

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