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Socket 775 Heatsink!


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#1
Knowguy

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I have been trying to build this new system for awhile now I can't get the LGA775 Heatsink to properly go into the 4 holes in the motherboard for nothing! I can get 2 pins in one side but then the otherside won't go in and I dont wanna force it any harder for fear of breaking the motherboard. ITS MAKING ME SO MAD THAT I CAN GET MY NEW SYSTEM RUNNING! :whistling:
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#2
austin_o

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Hi and welcome to Geeks to Go. What make and model motherboard? You should have a manual for the motherboard that will describe in detail how to install the CPU & heatsink. Study the manual carefully to make sure you are doing it right. If you don't have a manual, you can go to the motherboard manufacturer's web site and download one.
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#3
Knowguy

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The manual for my motherboard is very clear in what to do and I still am having trouble and I have studided several times as well as the CPU installation instructions...My motherboard is an ASRock 945G DVI model
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#4
RjBass

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What about the heatsink? Is it the stock LGA 775 heatsink that comes with Intel CPU's? Or is it an OEM heatsink like you would see in a Dell or Gateway machine?
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#5
Knowguy

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It is a stock Intel heatsink that came with a retail Celeron D 3.33GHz processor...
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#6
RjBass

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Well I'm looking at your mobo pics now and it appears as though it should just take the standard heatsink.

When you say it doesn't fit, what do you mean? Do the plugs on the heatsink not match up with the holes on the mobo?

Does it seem as if their is allot of stress on the mobo, as if the mobo is bending a bit when you go to insert one side of the heatsink?

If the holes don't match up and it is a new mobo then you prob got a bad mobo, although thats really rare for the holes to be cut wrong.

If it seems as though the board is bending slightly and is under allot of stress when you go to inset the 2nd side of the heatsink, well that is normal.

Having built more budget machines then I can count, I am hard pressed to remember a single time when a Intel heatsink inserted nice and smooth on a non Intel mobo.

What I would do if I was you, I would make sure the mobo is not installed into the case. Try installing the heatsink on the mobo while it is out of the case and on a completely flat surface (with static protection). The mobo may still bend a bit, and it can be difficult to get the 2nd two plugs into the board, but again its normal as the heatsink is supposed to have an extremely tight fit onto the cpu to ensure excellent heat transferring from the cpu to the heatsink.

You will have to use your own judgement as to what is to much pressure.

When I installed my Thermal Take Golden Orb II heatsink onto my Biostar mobo, it bent the board allot, and I thought for sure it was going to break, but it didn't. It was just a very awkward and extremely tight fit.
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#7
Knowguy

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Yeah it seems as if I keep pressing it down its going to snap something...its weird though I can get 2 pins on one side down without a problem and then the whole heatsink is at a slant like this "/" it just feels wrong that one sid eof the pins just go "plink" and they go right in...
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#8
Dan1887

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I know exactyl what you mean, when you press the one side in it lifts the otherside up and then it wont go in on the otherside without doing the samething by lifting the side u already had pressed in out. I have seen two answers to this. Push opposite corners in at the same time. Or take the mobo out of the case and install the heatsink ouside of the case before putting it in, this is the one I have seen most recommended. Or you can do what I did which was got really frustrated by it and go buy an aftermarkert cooler that just screws in.

Edited by Dan1887, 18 January 2007 - 11:43 AM.

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#9
Knowguy

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Any suggestions on an aftermarket heatsink that just screws in?
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#10
Dan1887

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I bought a Zalman 9500, It is an extremely good heatsink but it was 60 dollars. There are some that can be found for much cheaper I am sure, however you get what you pay for in that market.
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#11
Knowguy

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Wow im looking for something a little bit cheaper than that....thats more than the processor itself cost
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#12
SRX660

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I just had a problem intel fan assembly on a computer. What i found out is to make sure the heatsink is sitting level on the CPU and then push down and twist 2 screws that are opposite each other. If they click in the other 2 should click in easily. Make sure the pins are not already squeezed together. There should be about 1/2 inch sticking below the metal frame (white plastic part) when you start. Its real easy to lock the pin down without getting it connected to the motherboard.A lot of force is not needed but there is some force necessary to get them set right.

On the fan assembly i had, the customer had forced the pins to pull out without twisting them back the way they were to start with, so it ended up that he broke the pins locktabs. So you need to slow down and not force things too much when doing this. He did use a lot of force and was very mad when he called me.

A very good fan assembly i have found is the Zalman 7700 series coolers. The 92MM is not too large and even quieter than the stock intel fan assembly. I can't even hear the one i'm running in a intel 2.4 computer. The case fans drown it out for noise and i'm running the case fans on controllers for lower speed and noise. You can also get a 120 MM but it may not fit inside the case. I had to buy a shorty CD-RW to fit in a 120MM heatsink in a smaller ATX case. Lite-on drives are about 1/2 inch shorter than most others. NEC DVD-RW drives are also shorter than normal drives.

Zalman 92MM
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16835118112

Zalman 120MM
http://www.newegg.co...N82E16835118115

The kits have everything you need to hook them up.

SRX660
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#13
Knowguy

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Well I finally got the intel heatsink on....I pushed with enough force for it to stay in place although I didnt hear the clicking sound on the last pin, but I checked for it being secure and it would not budge so im pretty sure it is on good, anyways I left it on all night running diagnostics and defraging to see if the CPU would overheat and I woke up and it was still going so im guessing the heatsink is working properly. Thank you guys for your help!
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