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How do I use this hub?


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#1
chauncey

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hi,

I recently acquired a netgear ds104 four port dual speed hub. i would like to use it to access the internet

simultaneously using two different computers. the computers are both dell laptops, a latitude about 6 years

old with xp, and dell inspiron e1505 about 6 months old also on xp. my isp is road runner and the modem is

a toshiba pcx2500. i have no instructions for the netgear hub and any help would be appreciated.

thanks,

steve
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#2
silverbeard

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Most cable/DSL modems have router capable DHCP servers built in. You should be able to connect the hub to the modem then the PCs to the hub and check Network connections / Local Area Connection(double click and click on Support) be sure the modem assigned a different IP to each machine. This would indicate that the modem is able to do routing and you should be good to go.
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#3
chauncey

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i checked my lan and had an ip address. i then unplugged the modem, ran a line from it to the hub. i

then ran two lines to the hub from the two separate computers. one was able to access the internet. the

other was not and no longer had an ip address.

thanks,

steve
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#4
silverbeard

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I'm not familiar with your modem but gernerally you can enter the Default gateway into the address bar of your browser and access the Modem Interface. Look for settings that pertain to DHCP. There should be a range of adresses set to be assigned (E.G 192.168.1.100-150). If this is not the case then the firmware doesnt allow DHCP adressing.

you may be able to get around this by hard coding the connection that doesn't recieve an address. In network connections right click on the Local Area Connection and choose properties. Select Internet Protocal TCP/IP and click on Properties. On the Gerneral tab choose use the following addresses.

Example: If PC 1 has an IP of 192.168.1.100 and a default gateway 192.168.1.1 then for the other PC enter

IP 192.168.1.105 and the default gateway 192.168.1.1. The subnet mask will default to the same as connection 1. Now you have to set the DNS. I use the primary as 4.2.2.1 and secondary 4.2.2.2 click OK and close properties and restart the PC. see if you can surf.
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#5
chauncey

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Hi,

i probably should have mentioned that I'm not a computer expert, so I'm a little in the dark.
however, i tried the hard coding tip you posted. i don't know if i did it correctly or not. but it didn' work. here's what i did...


machine 1 that is able to access the internet had the following:

ip address 24.193.44.213 i changed machine 2 to 24.193.44.214


machine 1 default was 24.193.44.1 i changed the machine 2 to 24.193.44.2

the subnet mask is was 255.255.254.0 once i put the ip and default in machine 2 the subnet mask appeared as 255.0.0.0

as for the preffered dns server, i have know idea what you meant so i just put in 4.2.2.2
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#6
silverbeard

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Looking at the IP address you posted tells me that your modem doesn't use DHCP for network assignment. the adress you have is a public IP assigned to you by your ISP. A hub/switch is not going to work, your going to need a router to share the Internet connection.
Set PC 2 back to automatically obtian an address and atuomatically obtain DNS so that future attemps to set up a network will work.
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#7
chauncey

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thanks a lot for the help. i'll pick up a router this week and see how it goes. I appreciate the time you gave for my issue. have a great day.

thanks again,
steve
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#8
peterm

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Do you have a friend who has a router you can try.
What Silverbeard says should work in theroy as the the router will give out the address.
I have never used Cable modem. On page 17 of the user manual it says you have to ask the cable isp to set up more then 1 computer. Before spending money on a router ask the isp do they charge extra. You may be able to have both computers for the same cost. Worth an email or phone call. Info on page 4.
Modem Manual
Cheers
Peterm

Edited by peterm, 29 January 2007 - 02:08 AM.

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#9
Kurenai

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Here's how it works, at least in the US, Japan, UK, Canada, and Australia. Not sure about other countries.

Typically, you have two types of high speed internet: DSL and Cable. Australia also has Telstra, which uses some type of wierd PPPoA, but I believe they got broken up.

Cable internet typically uses a DHCP connection with MAC authentication. Cable modems are usually manufactured by RCA, Motorola, Scientific Atlanta, Arris, and a sprinkling of other companies.
You are assigned one IP address (the WAN IP) by your cable company, and the modem passes that through to a computer that is connected to it. The modem will also remember the MAC (media access controller) address of the first device plugged into it, and only let that device online (not always true, but usually). This cached MAC can usually be dropped by removing power from the modem for at least 10 minutes, or in the case of Arris (exclusively VoIP modems), pressing the reset button on the computer.

DSL connections use a protocol called PPPoE (Point to Point Protocol over Ethernet). Essentially, you send a username and password to the ISP, and they assign you an IP address. DSL modems are almost always modem/router combinations, as opposed to Cable modems, which are just modems, and have no routing functionality.
If a DSL modem is doing PPPoE, then the modem itself is sending your username and password to the ISP, then taking the WAN IP address for itself, and giving out private addresses to each device connected.
If DSL modem is in what is called bridge mode, then the computer (or router, or other connected device) is sending username and password information, and receiving the WAN IP address for itself.

You can connect a typical home router to either type of connection. The purpose of this router is to split the single WAN IP address into as many private addresses as are necesary, allowing multiple computers to connect to a single internet connection. A hub or a switch will not work for this, as it cannot split the connection, it just adds more ports.
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