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System Battery location


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#1
GregMiller

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I have a Packard Bell circa 1994 (Model: Force 53CD). When I boot up I get a line that reads: System Battery is dad. Replace and turn the ubti back on.

Trouble is, I'm looking at the motherboard and don't see any of those quarter size lithium batteries to replace. Whe are they hiding it?

There is one phone moden board that partically hides some of the motherboard - about 8 square inches- don't tell me it's under there!!!! [this isn't a tower, where the motherboard is in plain sight- it must be hidden- could it be on the reverse side of thw motherboard?

Am I looking for the wrong battery? Where could it be?
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#2
Tyger

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In older systems the system battery commonly takes two forms, one is a rechangable battery, usually a blue cylinder with three nicad cells and operates at 3.6 volts. There is the possibility that it works and just needs recharging, but likely it won't take a charge. The other form is a little rectangular battery, also three cells but not rechargable, and it is alkaline so 4.5 volts. It will generally be attached to the case with Velcro. Sometimes you can use either type on a system, you just change a jumper. If it is the non-rechargable type you can use any type of alkaline three cell battery, just take the connector off the old one. If you need to replace the rechargable type you can use just about any 3 cell battery of 1.2 volts per cell, or two alkaline cells at 1.7 volts per cell. You can get battery holders at Radio Shack.

If you're really lucky you might be able to find a manual for the unit.

Edited by Tyger, 28 January 2007 - 04:24 PM.

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#3
GregMiller

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I found what looks like a small round battery- it says rayovac lithium- it is attached to the motherboard by two small flat metal pieces. It will not wiggle or twist off- I am afraid I might break it off. Is it soldiered? Any ideas how to detach it without breaking? It's abou 2/3 the side of a dime (as thin).
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#4
Tyger

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I haven't seen such a battery, all the thin lithium batteries I've seen were removable without unsoldering. Is it lying flat or standing on it's side? If it's lying flat there may be another connection underneath it. If you have a voltmeter you may be able to tell if the two leads are the plus and minus. You would then only need to paralell it with another battery or just cut the leads and solder them to a lithuim battery with leads. Also, is the voltage 3.0 or 6.0.
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#5
vally

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Could it be able to slide out from under the metal pieces? Is it maybe caught with like a clamp?
U want 2 try and take a picture and post it so we can c the batt? i could not find any diagram an the net.
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#6
GregMiller

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Thanks for all your help. I decided to scuttle the CPU and just salvage the Hard Drive.

But just to add to my knowledge, I fiddled with the battery. It was attached solidly to the metal "arms" I had to twist them off. If I wanted to replace the battery, I could unsoldier the metal pieces from that battery, stick them to the new battery and then solder the metal aarms down. That would probably have worked, although I like that suggestion of piggybacking the battery.

Anyway, thanks for your advice. This has a happy ending and I think I learned a few new things.
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