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WinXP Math engine?


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#1
IO-error

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Hi geeks,

I was looking at a file which was 2567 bytes in size.
WinXP notified me about it that the size was 2.50 KB
I calculated that with the calculator and it should be 2.51 KB

Which file is calculating it for WinXP, because this is a bug and I'd like to fix it.

TIA
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#2
Retired Tech

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2567 Byte = 2.5068359 Kilobyte (KB)
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#3
IO-error

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Yeah, haven't you heard of rounding??? The 6 has to be rounded UP, so it becomes 2.51 KB.

So, if anybody knows the DLL or .EXE or whatever is doing the calculations, please tell me which file I have to look at.
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#4
Retired Tech

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How is it a bug then?
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#5
Neil Jones

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Which file is calculating it for WinXP, because this is a bug and I'd like to fix it.


There is no bug. Windows either rounds it down or chops it down to two significant figures after the decimal point. Windows 95 did this. Windows 98 did this. Windows ME did this. Windows 2000 did this. Vista still does this. Therefore there is no bug as it is intended behaviour.

Edited by Neil Jones, 30 January 2007 - 04:35 PM.

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#6
IO-error

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And not everybody wants it the gates-way...
It's not the correct way to show size. It's a small annoyance out of the millions of annoyances in WinXP and Microsoft products...

So, ok. There is no bug, but there is an annoyance and I'd like to know how to edit it. It doesn't really matter if it's a bug or not.

Edited by IO-error, 31 January 2007 - 03:10 AM.

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#7
Guest_rushin1nd_*

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You shouldnt be messing with computer configuration
Whats annoying is when some has a perfect working computer
and if thats not enough for the owner ..then mess around with it
there are millions of computers with the same math configuration
if it accomplishes anything what are your intentions
are you gonna post it or are you gonna inform microsoft of the fix
while other computer owners suffer from faulty drivers and lousy software that
harms their computer

so if your gonna mess around with it create a restore point

GOOD LUCK

Edited by rushin1nd, 31 January 2007 - 06:32 AM.

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#8
IO-error

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My intensions are empty. I just want to keep it for myself, because nobody else is interested in it. If I can manipulate it, I want to manipulate it. It just doesn't seem logical to me that 2.506 isn't 2.51... and I want to change that.
Btw, an operating system should be flexible for the user, not completly solid and unchangeable.

My simple question was, which file is doing the calculations? Is it the NTFS engine that tells WinXP how big it is? Is it a seperate DLL that does it? Or what.
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#9
Neil Jones

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At a best guess, the routine is stored in any one of the hundreds of DLLs on the system, but you'll probably find that its the actual shell itself that's doing the rounding, therefore to alter that would involve reverse engineering it. In all honesty, should it be possible, it's going to be far more trouble than it's worth.
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#10
IO-error

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Ok, so the best chance is to RE Explorer and/or Rundll32.

Reverse Enginering is illegal, right?

So if it is possible, it's still illegal... well, never mind then.
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