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#1
The_Shadow_630

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Here is my issue. I recently decided to share a DSL connection with a neighbor via a wireless network. I told him to go and buy the D-Link 54Mbps wireless router (which I know to be a good brand) and we should have no problems. Well, the D-Link ones were gone, so he bought a TrendNet one at about the same speed. The broadcast strength is about 13Dbm and it's minimum indoor transmit range is about 98ft. It is about 100ft from transmitter to reciever (which is in another building). The reciever did not detect the connection at all, so I bought a catenna booster hoping it would push the signal enough to connect. Now it connects, but not consistently and not with a good signal all the time. Do you all think I should just return the catenna and the router and go with the D-Link or is there something I am missing here that could be the cause of the problem.

The signal does have a good bit to go through (household wiring, plaster filled walls, brick outer wall, and all this in both buildings), but I figured it would at least reach the 100ft or less mark to get a decent signal. The catenna is inside and I have aimed it as best as I can, do you think moving it outside with an extender cable will help alot (like worth the money alot) or should I just replace the current equip with what I know to be better equipment?

Edited by The_Shadow_630, 07 February 2007 - 03:43 PM.

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#2
pip22

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Based on my own experience, a standard 54Mbps, '802.11g' spec wireless device (both router and receiver) can't communicate with each other beyond about 30 feet. My router is in an upstairs bedroom, and if I take my laptop into the living room I lose the connection.

But my son has a Belkin 125Mbps router and a belkin Wireless G+ laptop card. That gives coverage all around the house and even out in the garden.
If you can find a router with twin antenna (they are not hard to find) they can output an even stroger signal than a sinle antenna. Just make sure you get a belkin wireless card which is stamped "Wireless G+", not the standard wireless G.

Edited by pip22, 07 February 2007 - 05:04 PM.

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#3
The_Shadow_630

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Any suggestions on brands of routers? I was looking at a D-link 300Mbps RangeBooster router and the Linksys 300Mbps router. There is a significant price difference between the two (D-Link being the cheaper). I use a D-link router at work with the wireless network I manage and have had few to no problems with it, but it is all inside one building with very little distance to travel. The tech I talked to at the TigerDirect outlet of course suggested the Linksys router ($130). The Linksys has two standard antenna and a third directional looking antenna. The D-link has 3 standard antenna. I just need the range to reach his reciever with a strong and stable signal. Speed is not the utmost of importance, but the more performance the better of course.
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