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Securing a wireless network connection


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#1
rogerbid

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Hi,

Ever since I started to use a wireless router for my internet connection I have been telling myself I should make it secure. I have often started the process and then given up as it got too confusing! A couple of nights ago I had a weird pop up message (which I foolishly didnt write down) about an IP conflict which rightly or wrongly I took to mean that someone was trying to use my wireless internet connection.

Spurred on by this I have finally followed some instructions and hopefully I have succeeded in securing my connection using WPA-PSK. However, I do not know how I can verify that it is in fact as secure as I think it is.

Would someone please look at the enclosed screen shots and interpret them for me please?

Also, is there a way that I can test the security of my system?

Thanks very much, Roger

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#2
SuperSam

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Your network is now secured. There isn't really any way people can get in, unless they know the password or spend days hacking - but thats very rare. I don't know of any programs that can test your security, but to my knowledge WPA is the best encryption for wireless networks available for home users.
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#3
rogerbid

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Thanks SuperSam for the reassurance

Best wishes, Roger
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#4
AnthonyJ

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if you feel that way, you may want to change your security
Aircrack
aircrack is a set of tools for auditing wireless networks. It consists of: airodump (an 802.11 packet capture program), aireplay (an 802.11 packet injection program), aircrack (static WEP and WPA-PSK cracking), and airdecap (decrypts WEP/WPA capture files).

Edited by AnthonyJ, 10 February 2007 - 12:10 AM.

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#5
Kurenai

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And of course, someone could always break into your house and connect directly to your router. Better get a high level home security system and a gun to protect against that.
When it comes to home wireless, generally any security is enough. The thing that makes you most secure is the limited range of home wireless networking equipment. In my parents house, for example, no encryption is needed. Someone would literally have to be in the driveway to connect to the network. In my condo, I use WEP, since none of my neighbors are hard core computer geeks.
People who know how to break wireless encryption, and actively use that knowledge to malicious ends, are very rare from a home network standpoint. What you really need to protect against are the average people, especially teenagers, who are just looking with an opportunistic eye.
You wouldn't leave your car unlocked and running in a parking lot, you don't leave the door to your house unlocked when you aren't home, you don't leave your network unsecured, but you don't need to go overboard with any of these unless you are in a situation that really merits it.
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#6
AnthonyJ

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And of course, someone could always break into your house and connect directly to your router. Better get a high level home security system and a gun to protect against that.
When it comes to home wireless, generally any security is enough. The thing that makes you most secure is the limited range of home wireless networking equipment. In my parents house, for example, no encryption is needed. Someone would literally have to be in the driveway to connect to the network. In my condo, I use WEP, since none of my neighbors are hard core computer geeks.
People who know how to break wireless encryption, and actively use that knowledge to malicious ends, are very rare from a home network standpoint. What you really need to protect against are the average people, especially teenagers, who are just looking with an opportunistic eye.
You wouldn't leave your car unlocked and running in a parking lot, you don't leave the door to your house unlocked when you aren't home[color=#FF6666], you don't leave your network unsecured, but you don't need to go overboard with any of these unless you are in a situation that really merits it.

well back in the day before all the idiots we could trust our neighbors to keep a look out for one another and there was no need to lock our doors
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